TONGA

FLEET UPDATE 2023-08-20

 

South Pacifc Posse '23

 

    "Storms don't come to teach us painful lessons, rather they were meant to wash us clean."

- Shannon L. Alder


   SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE FLEET UPDATE 

2023-AUGUST-20

14 Ensigns
South Pacific Posse Gatherings

 
2+ SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE BOATS EQUAL A PARTY 

TOP NEWS

  • SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE PARTY
  • THE OCEAN POSSE 🐙 CALENDAR 
  • PICTURES OF THE WEEK
  • SAVUSAVU 🇫🇯  NAWI ISLAND MARINA LAUNCHED 
  • MUSKET 🇫🇯  COVE FIJI
  • NEIAFU VAVA'U 🇹🇴 TONGA
  • BLACKBIRDING 
  • ELECTRICAL BOAT HOW TO  
  • THE BANK ISLAND 🇻🇺 VANUATU  
  • THE PASSAGE TO NEW ZEALAND 
  • CLOUD NINE 🇫🇯 FIJI 
  • FLEET TRACKING FOR PARTICIPANTS  
  • CORRUPTION ALERT ⚠️ AMERICAN SAMOA 🇦🇸
  • GOOD NAUTICAL  
  • HISTORIC PORTS ⚓LAHAINA HAWAI'I

1) SOUTH PACIFC POSSE PARTY 
NAWI ISLAND 🇫🇯 FIJI

 

Monoriki

 

 16° 46.5716' S  179° 19.9533' E -  Nawi Island Savusavu 🇫🇯 Fiji

 

RSVP NOW
AUG 26 2023
 

 

NAWI ISLAND

 

All yachts are welcome - simply RSVP to get on the list >>

2)  SEMINARS,  EVENTS  MEETUPS FOR ALL  
THE OCEANPOSSE 🐙 CALENDAR 
  

join the fleet
 

https://oceanposse.com/calendar/

 

3)   PICTURES OF THE WEEK

Jack Iron

SY JACK IRON  🇺🇸   Kent & Michele - Valiant 42′

JACK IRON KentJACK IRON Michelle

 HUAHINE  🇵🇫 FP

Giant anemone (folded up) and purple coral.

Huahine was our last stop in French Polynesia, and one of our favorites.  
Giant anemone (folded up) and purple coral.

SY FIRST LIGHT  🇺🇸 Don & Julie  -  Hallberg Rassy 39′

FIRST LIGHT DonFIRST LIGHT Julie

4) SAVUSAVU 🇫🇯  NAWI ISLAND MARINA LAUNCHED 

A very nice place to stay with lot of place.

For the people who wants to know about Nawi Marina in Savusavu. 

A very nice place to stay with lot of place.

The Marina is done at about 70%  completed 

The Marina is done at about 70% but no possibility to haul out a boat and no specific technical services

It's
just a marvelous place to stay very friendly people there and the
restaurant has a very good kitchen, but no possibility to haul out a
boat and no specific technical services 

The pool is not ready just the restaurant, the bar, toilets and laundry are done. But it is very well done and nice here.

SY KAWAINE II  🇨🇭   Jean-Dominique & Guylène  - C.M.P.F. – Fecamp 42′

KAWAINE II Jean-DominiqueKAWAINE II Guylène
 

 NAWI ISLAND 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE 16° 46.566’S 179° 20.1’E BULA ! Nawi Marina is proud to sponsor the South Pacific Posse with discounted rates! NAWI ISLAND LOGO Idyllically located in the spectacular Savusavu Harbour, a port of entry to Fiji, the Nawi Island Marina welcomes the international yachting community with its 132 modern slips, providing safe and secure berths for monohull yachts, catamarans and superyachts. World Class Marina facilities, currently under development, will include a yacht club and extensive service facilities. Access to and from Nawi Island is simple and convenient, with Savusavu town nearby and Savusavu Airport just 10 minutes away. Nawi-Island-Marina AMENITIES & SERVICES MARINA 132 fully serviced berths 21 dedicated superyacht berths for vessels up to 85m 2m to 5.4m draft at mean sea level (msl). 16amps 3 phase from April 2023 and this will increase up to 250-300amps 3 phase from Dec 2023 Fresh Water, Fuel & Gas facilities Sewer pump out facility by June 2023 Garbage Disposal services High speed wireless internet 24/7 cctv security services with controlled marina gate access Restaurant & Bar Harbour Master Building Yacht Agency and authority clearance services Chandlery Grocery Store Restrooms, showers & laundry ATM Retail & Kiosk services BALAGA BOATYARD FACILITIES * Cyclone pits and storage bays Maintenance Shed & Back of House Area Haul out facility (75tonne) Boat ramp Fueling pontoon Wash Bay Engineering and welding workshop Paint and antifouling workshop Open maintenance areas for catamarans Office, restroom and outdoor lounge area with parking *BALAGA BOATYARD FACILITIES (under construction – to be completed by Dec 2023) CONTACT E: marketing@nawiisland.com P: +679 893 1082 W: nawiisland.com FB: facebook.com/nawiisland I: https://www.instagram.com/nawi.island A: PO Box 101, Lot 12, Nawi Island, Savusavu, Vanua Levu, Fiji Islands NAWI ISLAND MARINA RATES FJD x Meter x Day Meters / Feet MONOHULL FJD x Meter x Day MULTIHULL FJD x Meter x Day < 20 / 66 4.37 8.60 ≥ 20 / 66 8.60 8.60 ≥ 30 / 98 11.55 23.00 ≥ 50 / 164 17.35 ≥ 70 / 230 20.90 ≥ 85 / 279 24.00 Live Aboard Rate 7.50 per day Electricity Metered Water Included in Berth Fee -but please conserve * All rates are per lineal meter defined by LOA (other than Moorings) * All prices inclusive of 9% Government Taxes * All berthing to be paid in advance * Free WIFI included in berthing – conditions apply * Other marina services will have separate fees & charges SAFE APPROACH TO NAWI ISLAND MARINA + − 500 m 2000 ft goodnautical.com for pananaposse LOCATION OFFICIAL WEBSITE >> NAWI ISLAND MARINA OFFICIAL WEBSITE LINK

 

NAWI ISLAND MARINA 🇫🇯  16° 46.566’S 179° 20.1’E
SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

 

5) MUSKET 🇫🇯  COVE FIJI

Good night Musket Cove

Good night Musket Cove

SY SEAGLUB  🇺🇸 Chris - Hylas 46′

SEAGLUB Chris
MUSKET COVE FIJI

Musket
Cove stands as a haven for true seafaring aficionados. It's one of the
magnetic ports and therefore hard to get out of.  Everyone is
welcome. The discounts extended to the Pacific Posse  rally
participants are not just a gesture of benevolence, but a salute to the
shared devotion to life on the water—a nod that It acknowledges the call
of the open sea running through our veins. 

 

MUSKET COVE FIJI

 

6) NEIAFU VAVA'U 🇹🇴 TONGA

A rare sight in Tonga. Completely calm waters

A rare sight in Tonga. Completely calm waters

SY CATWEAZLE  🇬🇧 Harriet & Russell - Allures 45′

CATWEAZLECATWEAZLE

Vava'u,
a picturesque island group within the Kingdom of Tonga, stands as a
serene haven for small yachts . Nestled in the northern part of Tonga
the  Vava'u archipelago boasts a unique blend of natural beauty,
welcoming local culture, and inviting waters that welcomes sailors from
around the world. This maze like  destination offers a myriad of
anchorages for small yachts to explore its cruising grounds.

Vava'u Tonga

Vava'u's
charm lies in its breathtaking landscapes, where lush green hills meet
cerulean waters, creating a stunning backdrop for sailing adventures.
The island group encompasses numerous sheltered anchorages, secluded
coves, and pristine beaches. Most anchorages provide a calm sanctuary,
offering a tranquil refuge for sailors to drop anchor, unwind, and
immerse themselves in the beauty of nature.

 

 

The
archipelago is renowned for its vibrant underwater world, making it a
paradise for snorkelers and divers alike. Beneath the surface, coral
reefs burst with life, showcasing an intricate tapestry of colors and
marine species. Small yachts can anchor near snorkeling and diving
hotspots, offering easy access to this underwater wonderland teeming
with tropical fish, vibrant corals, and even the chance to swim
alongside majestic humpback whales during the annual migration season.

 The
warmth of the Tongan culture is an integral part of the Vava'u
experience. The locals, known for their genuine hospitality, greet
sailors with open arms. Visiting the local villages is an opportunity to
engage in cultural exchanges, learn traditional customs, and savor
Tongan cuisine. The Tongan people's genuine smiles and warm interactions
create an enriching experience that leaves an indelible mark on the
hearts of visiting sailors.

Mango Cafe

Mango Cafe & dinghy dock 

Community and Camaraderie:

The
small yachting community that gravitates toward Vava'u fosters a strong
sense of camaraderie among fellow sailors. Small businesses in the area
provide essential amenities and opportunities to connect with other
adventurers. The exchange of stories, tips, and experiences adds to the
allure of Vava'u as a place where friendships are forged and shared
passions are celebrated.

In
essence, Vava'u encapsulates the essence of a quintessential yachting
paradise. Its azure waters, captivating landscapes, hospitable locals,
and vibrant marine life converge to create an idyllic haven for small
yachts. Every voyage through its cruising grounds reveals new wonders,
ensuring that sailors leave with cherished memories and a longing to
return to the tranquil embrace of Vava'u, Tonga.

 

Neiafu Harbor

 

7)  BLACKBIRDING 

Kanaka workers in a sugar cane plantation in Queensland, late 19th century.

 Kanaka workers in a sugar cane plantation in Queensland, late 19th century.

The practice of "blackbirding"
in the mid to late 1800s in the South Pacific refers to the recruitment
of coerced labor of Pacific Islanders, primarily from Melanesia and
Polynesia, to work on plantations in other parts of the world. It was
driven by the demand for cheap labor to work on sugar cane, cotton, and
other agricultural plantations.

Para (ship) South Sea Islanders, recruited for the Queensland cane fields, being carried in boats to the Para. (Descriptions supplied with photograph). The English artist who produced this drawing, William Twizell Wawn, captained ships between 1875 and 1891.

Para (ship) South Sea Islanders, recruited for the Queensland cane fields, being carried in boats to the Para. 
William Twizell Wawn, captained ships between 1875 and 1891. 

The
demand for labor during the 4 year US Civil War lead to an increase in
the practice of black birding. The war and subsequent union victory and
end of slavery meant a continued  need for labor on plantations to
produce cotton and sugar cane. This resulted in an intensified
recruitment of Pacific Islanders through blackbirding to meet the offshore labor needs.

these exploitative labour market practices in the sugar industry started in 1863 – almost 60 years after Britain and the United States had made slave trading illegal.

Exploitative
labor market practices in the sugar industry started in 1863 – almost
60 years after Britain and the United States had made slave trading
illegal.

Tens
of thousands of Pacific Island laborers were brought to Australia from
neighboring Melanesian and Polynesian islands.  In particularly
Queensland, during the late 19th century used these indentured laborers
for work on sugarcane plantations. Estimates suggest around 60,000 to
80,000 humans were involved.

Fiji
was another major destination and saw a significant influx of
blackbirded laborers, with estimates ranging from 60,000 to 70,000
individuals. The sugarcane industry in Fiji heavily relied on coerced
labor.

The deportations began in 1906 and continued until 1908. More than 7500 South Sea Islanders were returned to their home country, though some had arrived in Australia at such a young age they would have had no memory of it. About 2500 Pacific Islanders stayed in Australia.

In
Australia and other colonial powers involved in black birding,
legislative measures were introduced to regulate and eventually restrict
the recruitment of labor from Pacific Island nations. These measures
aimed to improve labor conditions and protect the rights of indigenous
populations. The practices associated with blackbirding were
increasingly criticized by humanitarian and human rights advocates
internationally. Reports of abuse, mistreatment, and exploitation of
laborers led to growing pressure on countries involved in the practice
to address these concerns. In various regions, including Australia and
Fiji, labor reforms were introduced to address the unethical practices
associated with blackbirding. The goal was to ensure fair treatment,
appropriate wages, and better working conditions for laborers.
Indigenous communities in affected regions began advocating for their
rights and raising awareness about the mistreatment and exploitation
they faced due to blackbirding. Their efforts contributed to increased
attention on the issue and the need for change. As economies evolved and
industries changed, the demand for labor through blackbirding
diminished. Economic factors, coupled with increased awareness of
ethical concerns, contributed to the decline of the practice. By the
early 20th century, blackbirding had largely faded as a widespread
practice due to a combination of the factors mentioned above. Many
countries introduced laws and reforms to prevent the recruitment of
labor through coercion and deception. While the formal abolition of
blackbirding marked an important step in ending the exploitative
practices, it's important to recognize that the legacy of blackbirding
continues to impact affected communities to this day. The efforts to
remember this history, address its consequences, and promote awareness
of human rights and social justice continue in the affected regions.

bundaberg 1895

The deportations  began
in 1906 and continued until 1908. More than 7,500 South Sea Islanders
were returned to their home country, though some had arrived in
Australia at such a young age they would have had no memory of their
exact origin.  Indenture ceased in Fiji in 1911.

SUGRA PRICE HISTORY.

200+ years of sugar pricing 

The official Australian South Sea Islander flag initially designed in consultation with the ASSI community. The flag was formally adopted in 1998 by ASSIUC. The colour scheme incorporates colours resonant to people with forebears of which the three quarters of the trade were taken from the 83 islands of Vanuatu and are represented through colours green, gold and black, a third of the trade was from the Solomon Islands represented with blue, white, green. The overall flag is inclusive other parts of the South Pacific affected by Blackbirding as we are connected through the ocean blue and white stars.

The
official Australian South Sea Islander flag initially designed in
consultation with the ASSI community. The flag was formally adopted in
1998. The color scheme incorporates colors resonant to people with
forebears of which the three quarters of the trade were taken from the
83 islands of Vanuatu and are represented through colors green, gold and
black, a third of the trade was from the Solomon Islands represented
with blue, white, green. The overall flag is inclusive other parts of
the South Pacific affected by Blackbirding as we are connected through
the ocean blue and white stars.

8) ELECTRICAL BOAT HOW TO  

 

https://oceanposse.com/events/boat-how-to-ocean-posse-seminar-sat-sep-2-2023/

 

SAT Sept 2 - we have a zoominar with Nigel Calder introducing BOATHOWTO

BOAT HOW TO & OCEAN POSSE SEMINAR – SAT SEP 2 2023

We are please to announce an introduction to BOAT HOW TO and their most comprehensive online learning   system.

This ZOOM introduction is hosted by NIGEL CALDER

INTRODUCTIONS TO THE FOLLOWING YACHT ELECTRICAL SYSTEM TOPICS

  •     Properly sizing conductors ( q&a )
  •     Making reliable connections ( q&a )
  •     Batteries The Charging System  ( q&a )
  •     Best practices of monitoring and improving your electrical system ( q&a )
  •     Adding appropriate over current protection ( q&a )
  •     Check before you head out ( q&a )
  •     Simple troubleshooting techniques ( q&a )
  •     Emergency repairs, parts and tools ( q&a )
  •     Back Up system ( q&a )

TIME

Sat Sept 2 @ 7 AM Pacific Time 10 AM Eastern Time 4 PM Spain - follow the link above to the zoom link 

  https://oceanposse.com/events/boat-how-to-ocean-posse-seminar-sat-sep-2-2023/

Nigel’s Story

 

Nigel
got into motorcycles and sailing dinghies as a teenager, and has never
been far from mechanical things and boats ever since. He has a BA in
Philosophy from Exeter University (UK) and an MSc in Operations Research
from Sussex University. In a varied career, before becoming a full-time
sailing writer, with a focus on marine technical systems, he worked on
automotive assembly lines, in foundries and machine shops, and on
offshore oil production platforms.

He
and his wife, Terrie, built a couple of 70-foot canal boats (on which
they lived in England), and a 39-foot Ingrid cutter. They then sailed a
Pacific Seacraft 40 for 5 years, following which they had a Malo 45
built in Sweden. This was sold to be replaced by the same boat but with
an experimental electrical distribution and propulsion system.

It
has been used for extensive testing of cutting edge systems, including a
4-year European Union funded project (HyMar), of which Nigel was the
Technical Director, investigating the applicability of hybrid
technologies to marine propulsion systems. Based on data collected
during the HyMar project, Nigel initiated, and was a lead developer in, a
multi-year project resulting in the award-winning advanced generator
technology now sold under the Integrel brand name.

Nigel
and Terrie have sailed in the North Sea, the Atlantic as far north as
the Faroe Islands and as far south as Portugal, the U.S. east coast, the
Bahamas and extensively in the Caribbean, with Pippin (now aged 37) and
Paul (36) augmenting the crew along the way. In addition to his books
on boat systems and hundreds of magazine articles, he has also authored a
‘Cruising Guide to the Northwest Caribbean’, ‘Cuba: A Cruising Guide’,
‘Nigel Calder’s Cruising Handbook: a Compendium for Coastal and Offshore
Sailors’ and ‘How to Read a Nautical Chart’. He recently released a
memoir of his family’s first long cruise titled ‘Shakedown Cruise’.

Nigel
is currently the Technical Editor and/or Associate Editor of
PassageMaker, Professional Boatbuilder, Sail, and Ocean Navigator
magazines and a consultant on marine energy issues. He has recently
joined marine energy systems company OceanPlanet Energy as a mechanism
to continue his passion for constantly improving boat electrical
systems.

Nigel
is a 30-year veteran of the American Boat and Yacht Council’s
Electrical Project Technical Committee, which writes the U.S. standards
for recreational boat electrical systems, and a founder member of
www.BoatHowTo.com, the online marine technical education site which is
at the heart of today’s discussion.’

Dr. Jan C. Athenstädt

Jan
runs KlabauterKiste, the German online magazine for boatowners and
Klabauter-Shop, an online shop for boat electrics as well as
BootsBastler.org, a German online community for people who love “messing
about in boats”.

He holds a PhD in computer science and loves to teach people new skills.

ver since he set foot on his grandfather’s boat as a child, Jan has been dreaming of sailing around the world.

During
his studies in computer science, he has worked as a deckhand and bosun
on tall ships such as the Schooner Zodiac and the Bark Europa, sailing
well over 10,000 miles on the world’s oceans and making it all the way
down to Antarctica. In recent years, he has been responsible for
rewiring and maintaining the technical systems on various yachts, such
as the research vessel Aldebaran.

Jan
holds a PhD from Konstanz University and a master’s degree from
Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. (Both in Computer Science, but for
his PhD he worked with archaeologists in the Caribbean, using network
science to reconstruct pre-Columbian voyages.) He also studied for a
year at the University of Washington in Seattle on a Fulbright grant,
which gave him the opportunity to explore the beautiful Pacific
Northwest and British Columbia.

When
he bought his Laurin32 Ahora in north Germany to prepare it for
extensive cruising, he noticed that there is very little reliable
information on the internet about boat electrics and mechanics. So he
started the German online magazine KlabauterKiste where he publishes
technical advice as well as stories about boatbuilding and refit
projects.

In
order to help boatowners acquire supplies for their rewiring projects,
he started his online store Klabauter-Shop, where people can order
everything from a simple cable lug to a high end radar system. 

9) THE BANK ISLAND 🇻🇺 VANUATU  

the banks vanuatu torba province

The Banks Islands (in Bislama Bankis)
are a group of islands in northern Vanuatu. Together with the Torres
Islands to their northwest, they make up the northernmost province of
Torba.  

Entracne to Ureparapara

To
the east of these larger islands lie a number of smaller ones. The
furthest north of them 31 mi  northeast of Ureparapara, is Vet
Tagde (also known as Vot Tande or Vot Ganai), which is an extinct
volcano that last erupted 3.5 million years ago.   Ureparapara (also known as Parapara means  "full of slopes"  ), is an old volcanic cone that has been breached by the sea, forming a bay, known as Divers Bay, on its east coast.

 Ureparapara entrance

 Ureparapara Entrance 

Anchored in Dives Bay

Anchored in Dives bay Ureparapara 

ROWA

Other small islands in this eastern chain in the Banks Island group include the Rowa Islands
(also called the Reef Islands), which are a few very small, low islands
on a coral atoll and are unihabited. Mota Lava is the largest and
highest (411 m) of this eastern chain of islands; off its southern
coast, attached by high corals that can be waded through at low tide, is
the tiny islet of Ra. The islands of Mota, Merig, and Merelava complete
the southeastern part of the archipelago.

GAUA

The
largest island is Gaua (formerly called Santa Maria), which has a
rugged terrain, rising to Mount Gharat, an active volcano at the centre
of the island, at 797 m (2,615 ft). Gaua's freshwater Lake Letas, in its
volcanic crater, is the largest lake in Vanuatu. A slightly smaller
island in the group, Vanua Lava, is higher, at 946 m (3,104 ft); it too
has an active volcano: Mount Suretamate (also spelled Süretimiat or
Sere'ama, 921 m (3,022 ft)). To the east of Vanua Lava are two islets in
the groupo, Ravenga and Kwakea (also spelled Qakea). Sola, the
provincial capital, is on Vanua Lava. 

SY CARINTHIA '09  

     

10) THE PASSAGE TO NEW ZEALAND 

ZOOM WEBINAR SEP 30 2023

Should I stay or should I go ?

 

https://oceanposse.com/events/the-passage-to-new-zealand-presented-by-ocean-tactics/

 

YOUR PASSAGE TO NEW ZEALAND 
presented by  John Martin from Ocean Tactics

JOHN MARTIN
 

South Pacific Posse

 


SEASON '24 SIGN UP STARTS IN DECEMBER 

11) CLOUD NINE 🇫🇯 FIJI
SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

 

CLOUD 9

 

CLOUD 9 🇫🇯 FIJI

12) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE  
🏆 
AWARD CATEGORIES 

  • BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT ✔ 
  • PICTURE OF THE YEAR ✔  
  • PACIFIC POSSE YODA OF THE YEAR ✔  
  • THE CAPTAIN RON AWARD ✔
  • MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD ✔ 
  • HIGHEST WIND RECORDED ✔ 
  • SPIRIT OF EXPLORATION ✔ 
  • GALLEY GOD(ESS) ✔ 
  • SPEEDY AWARD
  • GOOD SAMARITAN OF THE YEAR ✔  
  • BOAT YOGA POSE OF THE YEAR ✔
  • COURAGE AWARD 

Burgee Back

South Pacific Posse '23 BUrgee Front

13)  "AND THEY ARE UNDERWAY"
 FLEET TRACKING FOR PARTICIPANTS  
 

 

Tracking

 

 About Tracking:

Designed to give interesting parties  an overview. For specific vessel details including their float plan,
latest updates, changes, positions and specific location related
questions please contact each vessel directly.  If you are on
passage let us know and the fleet can monitor your progress.

https://pacificposse.com/add-to-tracking

14) CORRUPTION ALERT ⚠️ AMERICAN SAMOA 🇦🇸

AMERICAN SAMOA - an  unincorporated US TERRITORY FEATURES SOME CORRUPT OFFICIALS AS REPORTED BY SEVERAL VESSELS 

While
currently these "facilitation fees" without receipts  are
relatively small this sets a dangerous precedence and we plan on
reaching out to law enforcement. Corruption is usually the first step in
a bureaucrats downfall. It's ok to offer officials some food or non
alcoholic beverages upon clearing in  paying under the table fees
is ill advised and illegal - pleas email any reports to
registration@pacificposse.com ( anonymous ok ) we will start beating the
drums on behalf of all seafarers.

CORRUTPTION IN AMERICAN SAMOA

QUICK FACT :
THE
U.S. Department of the Interior Interior provided $26.6 Million to
American Samoa for Fiscal Year 2022 Government Operations  - for a
link to how much agency support the US government provides AS
follow this link >>

15) FREE ACCESS TO GOOD NAUTICAL  

IF
YOU ARE SIGNED UP FOR THE  '23 SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE  you will
be assigned  access credentials to GOODNAUTICAL South Pacific
regions 

 
 

 

Good Nautical

 

CONSIDER MAKING A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION TO GOOD NAUTICAL 

https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/goodnautical

 

https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/goodnautical

 

NEW CALEDONIA'S ANCHORAGES ARE IN GOOD NAUTICAL 

16) HISTORIC PORTS ⚓ OF THE  PACIFIC 
LAHAINA HAWAI'I

The Port of Lahaina goes back almost two centuries since Lahaina was the capital of the Kingdom of Hawaii from 1820 to 1845.

 Lahaina Harbor
 Lahaina Harbor

Historic View of Lahaina by J G Sawkins

Lahaina 3

The
Old Lahaina Fort was originally built in 1831 by Hoapili, the Royal
Governor of Maui. He built the fort to protect the town from riotous
sailors when Lahaina was used as an anchorage for the North Pacific
whaling fleet.

After
the fort was demolished in 1854, a courthouse was built on the site. A
portion of the old Lahaina Fort was reconstructed in 1964.  

Lahaina

Whaling
ships hunting sperm whales in the Pacific began to arrive in Hawaiʻi in
1819, and many ships anchored in Honolulu and Lahaina. The impact of
the whaling fleets on the Hawaiian Islands during the reign of
Kamehameha III (1825–1854) shaped the entire Hawaiian economy and was
the primary source of income for the islands until the discovery of oil
in Titusville, Pennsylvania in 1859 and the onset of the American Civil
War (1861–1865).

Kamehameha III and Kalama, ca. 1850

Kamehameha III and Kalama, ca. 1850

 Ships
would generally seek repairs in Honolulu, but captains preferred
anchoring off Lahaina because of its easy access from the Lahaina Roads
and for the fresh provisions available in town. According to Henry L.
Sheldon, "the business of the entire population was the furnishing of
supplies to whalers and entertaining the crews". Sailors who had been
hunting whales for months at a time went to Lahaina to drink grog and
meet women.

LAHAINA

By
1825 a kapu prohibiting women from going out to ships for the purpose
of prostitution was proclaimed by the Hawaiian chiefs (ali'i ). Enraged
that they could not cajole, coax, or coerce Hawaiian women into
violating the kapu, the sailors turned their frustrations on the
American missionaries, whom they blamed for the emergence of this new
unreasonably strict moral law.

Whalers
opposed any rules governing alcohol and prostitution, and blamed
missionaries for influencing the Kingdom of Hawaii to enforce such
rules. Riots broke out at least four times—in 1825, 1826, 1827, and
1843. In the 1827 riots, sailors on the John Palmer fired their cannons
at the home of missionary William Richards and threatened the safety of
the community.

Lahina

Queen
Kaʻahumanu (1768–1832) visited Maui in February 1832, just months
before she died, to support the construction of a new fort to protect
the town from whalers. With her help, Hoapili (1775–1840), Royal
Governor of Maui, built the fort on the Lahaina waterfront and it was
completed within a month. The fort was constructed from coral blocks
with walls approximately 15–20 feet high topped with 47 cannons. An 1848
inventory lists 6 large cannons, 21 small cannons, 6 breech-loaders,
and 8 which did not work. The fort stored quantities of gunpowder, guns,
rifles, and swords, and was used as a prison. Sailors who docked at
Lahaina were subject to a sunset curfew; it they did not return to their
ship when the drums sounded they would be imprisoned in the fort.

John Stobart - Lahaina Maui: The Whaling Brig

John Stobart - Lahaina Maui: The Whaling Brig "Isabella" Arriving In 1865

In
1841, American naval officer Charles Wilkes (1798–1877) visited Lahaina
Fort as commanding officer of the United States Exploring Expedition.
Wilkes observed, "After the king's palace, the fort is the most
conspicuous object: it is of little account, however, as a defence,
serving chiefly to confine unruly subjects and sailors in.

As
the whaling industry declined and the California Gold Rush gained
prominence in the late 1840s, Hawaii's population dropped, and
infectious disease epidemics contributed to the loss of local
populations. The fort was restored in 1847 but was now used more as a
prison than for defending the Kingdom. The cannons were rusting and the
fort was mostly empty of personnel except for a few soldiers and the
Governor of Maui who lived there. When Henry Augustus Wise visited in
1848, he met James Young (1797–1851), then Governor of Maui, who was
living in the fort.

Wise
wrote that it was: "an oddly assorted battery of some thirty pieces of
artillery, of all sorts of carriages and calibre—long, short, and
mediums; they command the usual anchorage, and no doubt do very well to
prevent any acts of violence from merchant ships; but it is a question,
if, at the second discharge of shot, they do not tumble to pieces."

Hawaii Flag

17) MEET OUR SPONSORS 

  • PREDICT WIND
  • PANAMA CANAL AGENT ERICK GALVEZ CENTENARIO CONSULTING
  • YACHT AGENTS GALAPAGOS
  • YACHT AGENTS NUKU HIVA
  • SAIL TAHITI
  • OCEAN TACTICS | PACIFIC WEATHER ROUTING
  • SHELTER BAY MARINA PANAMA
  • DENARAU MARINA FIJI
  • NAWI ISLAND MARINA
  • VUDA POINT MARINA
  • COPRA SHED MARINA FIJI
  • CLOUD 9
  • PUERTO AMISTAD ECUADOR
  • RIVERGATE MARINA AUSTRALIA
  • MARSDEN COVE MARINA NEW ZEALAND
  • GULF HARBOUR MARINA NEW ZEALAND
  • YACHTING WORLD MARINA PORT VILA VANUATU

WE OPERATE UNDER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW

YOUR VESSEL YOUR CREW YOUR RESPONSIBILITY 





South Pacific Posse
VATU

The colorful VATU

 

 


FLEET UPDATE 2023-06-11

 

South Pacifc Posse '23

 

"Do just once what others say you can't do, and you will never pay attention to their limitations again.."

- Captain James Cook FRS


SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE
FLEET UPDATE

2023-06-11

13 Ensigns

63 Yachts from 13 ensigns are part of a forward scouting fleet looking for opportunities and looking out for threats.

To join follow this link >>

Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre Noumea designe by Renzo Piana Noumea New Caledonai

Jean-Marie Tjibaou Cultural Centre Noumea designed by Renzo Piano 🇳🇨 NEW CALEDONIA

TOP NEWS

  • L'ÎLOT AMÉDÉE 🇳🇨 NEW CALEDONIA
  • PICTURES OF THE WEEK
  • GET YOUR BURGEE
  • MONSOON'S TAKE
  • SAVE THE DATE
  • OCEAN TACTICS 🌪🌀
  • CYCLONE HOLES 🇫🇯 FIJI
  • RIVERGATE MARINA & SHIPYARD 🇦🇺
  • MANUAL TRACKING WITH PREDICT WIND SWITCH OVER
  • BOLO ALERT
  • HISTORIC PORTSVAVA'U KINGDOM OF 🇹🇴 TONGA

1) L'ÎLOT AMÉDÉE
🇳🇨 NEW CALEDONIA

 Amedee Lighthouse

The Amedee Lighthouse, located near Noumea, New Caledonia has some fascinating facts.

Construction: The Amedee Lighthouse was constructed in France in the late 1860s and was shipped in pieces to New Caledonia. It was designed by French engineer, Henri Becquerel, and stands as a testament to 19th-century engineering.

Tower Height: The lighthouse stands at a height of 56 meters (184 feet). It is one of the tallest lighthouses in the Southern Hemisphere and offers panoramic views of the surrounding ocean and islands surrounded by white sandy beaches and crystal-clear waters with sea turtles nearby.

The lighthouse is made of cast iron plates, which were riveted together to form the cylindrical tower. It features a spiral staircase with 247 steps leading to the lantern room at the top. The lighthouse's distinctive red and white stripes make it easily recognizable.

The Amédée Lighthouse

The Amedee Lighthouse is not just a historical , it is still an active lighthouse. It serves as an essential navigational aid, guiding ships through the coral reefs and marking the entrance to the Noumea harbor.

The lens, the original one fitted, is made up of a series of prismatic segments and known as a Fresnel lens. It was made in Paris in 1862 by the Société des Etablissements Henry-Lepaute. It was brought, dismantled, to New Caledonia and reassembled on top of the Amédée lighthouse in 1865. It was removed in 1985 when the lighthouse was automated, and replaced by a more modern lens.

The original lense was made up of a series of prismatic segments and known as a Fresnel lens. It was made in Paris in 1862 by the Société des Etablissements Henry-Lepaute and was replaced in 1985.

Conservation

Conservation Efforts: Due to its ecological importance, Amedee Island and its surrounding waters have been designated a marine protected area. This designation aims to preserve the diverse marine ecosystem and promote sustainable tourism practices

 Ilot Amadee

⚓ Good Anchorage & Mooring Balls @ 22° 28.55 S 166° 27.93 E Ilot Amadee 🇳🇨 NEW CALEDONIA

2) PICTURES OF THE WEEK

Suwarrow

@ anchor with sharks

At anchor

very good visibility * location withheld ;-)

At Anchor

SY GLADAN 🇵🇱 Giancarlo & Paola - Lagoon 44′

Gladan PaolaGladan Giancarlo
Mt Yasur

Mt Yasur Volcano in Vanuatu with David in all it's glory

On the edge of hell

On the edge of the caldron - phet phet phet is the sound of 2000 degree lava rocks landing all around you as they are launched at 1,000°C / 1,800°F. Estimated to erupt 10-20 times every hour as the volcano is constantly rumbling and causing the ground to shake.

MT YASUR

SY DREAMER 🇺🇸 David & Gerne - Caliber 40lrv’

DREAMER CrewDREAMER GerneDREAMER David
 

Experience in 30 seconds what a volcanic eruption looks like up close !

VANUATU IS IN GOOD NAUTICAL

VANUATU IS IN GOOD NAUTICAL ⚓

Rolling Stones

SY ROLLING STONES 🇺🇸 Geoff, Meghan & crew Leopard 45′

Rolling Stones Rolling Stones Rolling Stones Rolling Stones Rolling Stones
FIRST LIGHT

SKY LIGHT

 A coral bombie off a motu in Tahanea atoll

A coral bommie off a motu in Tahanea atoll FP

UNderwater

The sailing duo of Don Atwood and Julie Dunne will be chronicling their adventures, both land and sea with pictures and stories as they journey across the South Pacific aboard the sailboat First Light.

Coral
At Peace

More shots of the beautiful atolls of French Polynesia.

Floating the anchor chain to avoid coral damage and avoiding getting tangled up our bommies

FIRST LIGHT

SY FIRST LIGHT Don & Julie - Hallberg Rassy 39′

FIRST LIGHT DonFIRST LIGHT Julie
 

Marquesas
Marquesas
NANAI

SY NANAI 🇺🇸 Chris, Kay, Kevin & Mark - Tashing,Taswell 49′

3) GET YOUR BURGEE FROM KEVIN
@ NUKU HIVA YACHT SERVICES

Burgee Back

South Pacific Posse '23 BUrgee Front

Yacht Services Nuku Hiva 🇵🇫 Sponsors the South Pacific Posse

Yacht Services Nuku Hiva 🇵🇫 Sponsors the South Pacific Posse

I look forward to meeting and helping the participants

Cheers, Kevin

BP 301 Taiohae, 98742 Nuku Hiva, French Polynesia

+689 87 22 68 72, YSNukuHiva@hotmail.com

VHF 72, Monday – Friday 0800-1400

4) INTRODUCING THE LATEST
SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE MARINA

MUSKET COVE MARINA 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE PANAMA POSSE

MUSKET COVE FIJI

We welcome any of the South Pacific Posse to Musket Cove at any time.

We’re pleased to offer a Free Berthing Day for 5 Paid Days to all South Pacific Posse Members.

Wayne Deed Musket ove Fiji

Wayne Deed
Musket Cove Fiji

Musket COve Fiji

Musket Cove in Fiji is a renowned destination that holds a special allure for yachts from all around the world.

Musket Cove is located in the idyllic Mamanuca Islands of Fiji, surrounded by crystal-clear turquoise waters, pristine beaches, and lush tropical landscapes. The natural beauty is breathtaking and provides a perfect backdrop for hanging out a season in the tropics.

Fiji offers excellent sailing conditions and service oriented staff and vendors with consistent trade winds, calm waters, and numerous sheltered anchorages and amazing surf breaks. Musket Cove, in particular, benefits from its strategic location within the Mamanuca Islands, providing easy access to nearby islands, reefs, and marine parks with an easy ferry to get you and your crew and guest back to and from the main island and Nandi airport.

The marina offers a range of services, including berthing, fueling, making it a convenient and well-equipped base for yachts to dock, moor and refuel.

Musket Cove has developed a vibrant yachting community hosting various events, races, regattas, and social gatherings, fostering a sense of camaraderie among cruisers. These events provide opportunities for networking, sharing experiences, and celebrating the joy of exploring via yacht.

It also offers a range of amenities and services that appeal beyond sailors. The Musket Cove Island Resort provides luxurious accommodation, restaurant options spa facilities, and additional recreational activities, allowing you to unwind and indulge in a relaxed setting.

MUSKET COVE MARINA 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE PANAMA POSSE

5) MORE PICTURES OF THE WEEK

BRAVO ZULU

enjoying some dolphins in the distance, or maybe to get some alone time

Mary Caraway Ewing enjoying some dolphins in the distance, or maybe to get some alone time

More exploration of the dramatic Marquesas. These islands were once the home of tens of thousands of Polynesians

We sail where the coconuts grow

We sail where the coconuts grow and ... FALL!

Local Fruits

Legendary Pampelmousse and local fruits grow among breadfruit plant or 'uru, the coconut, the dozens of varieties of bananas including the incomparable orange plantain banana or fe'i, various root vegetables such as the taro, the tarua, the ufi, and the 'umara make up the basis of island cuisine

 Tiki: Anthropomorphic Sculptures, Sacred Structures and Powerful Places in Marquesas Islands Tiki : Sculptures anthropomorphiques, structures et localités sacrées des îles Marquises Sidsel Millerstrom p. 1828-1846 Abstract Index Text Bibliography Notes AuthorIllustrations Abstract English Français The ancient Marquesan anthropomorphic stone and wood sculptures or tiki have received wide attention since they were first noted in 1595. However, they have not been systematically and scientifically studied until the Marquesas Rock Art Project was created in 1984. Over several years eighty‑four anthropomorphic sculptures were located through intensive field survey and interviews with local Marquesan. Information gathered at each site included metric data, archaeological, social, architectural and environmental context. Stylistically the Marquesan stone tiki are remarkably similar and followed certain social rules. The similar characteristics also seen in Marquesan rock art, tattoo, and material objects suggest that the fundamental principles regarding the symbolic order remained unchanged for a long time. Moreover, the homogeneous decorative system demonstrates that the Marquesan adhered to a common ideology and belief system. Index terms Mots clés : Océanie, Polynésie française, Îles Marquises, Tiki, pierres anthropomorphiques, archéologie, sculpture sur bois, art rupestre, lieux sacrés, tatouage Keywords : Oceania, Marquesas Island, Tiki, anthropomorphic stone, archaeology, wood Sculptures, rock art, sacred place, tattoo Full text Acknowledgement The Marquesan Rock Art Project was a team effort and several archaeologists and local volunteers worked with us. While they are too numerous to mention here I am grateful for their enthusiasm, help and their friendship. I wish to acknowledge Maeva Navarro, former director of C.P.S.H., Tahiti, for initiating the Marquesan Rock Art Project, and for allowing my team and me to conduct research in the Marquesas. I thank her for her support and encouragement. Thank you to Edmundo Edwards, with whom I was fortunate to be able to work; he headed the project and became my working partner from the beginning. His knowledge of Polynesia and his overwhelming generosity and kindness touched everybody. Heidy Baumgartner Lesage, a long‑time friend and team mate, and I spent much time together in the Marquesas surveying, recording the petroglyphs, tiki, and associated architecture. I will always be indebted to Heidy for her sound advice and companionship. I thank the government of French Polynesia for allowing me to do archaeological research in the islands and for the many Marquesan that housed and fed us, showed us archaeological sites and became our friends. Introduction 1 A publication about a tiki exhibit in 2016, Tahiti, just become available. Tik (...) 1Since the 1590s, with the arrival of the first Europeans to the Marquesan Archipelago, stone and wood sculptures have been described, exhibited, photographed, sketched, painted and admired. However, the sculptures have never been systematically surveyed, documented and analysed. I present here a summary of metric information and empirical observation generated from data collected on the stone sculptures during several archaeological field seasons to the Marquesas Islands.1 2In 1984, Maeva Navarro, then Director of Département d’Archéologie, Centre Polynésien des Sciences Humaines, Te Anavaharau, Tahiti (C.P.S.H), initiated the Marquesas Island Rock Art Project. This government organization is presently known as Service de la Culture et du Patrimoine (S.C.P). Edmundo Edwards, then chief archaeologist with the department, directed the project. I was part of the venture from the beginning. During the Marquesan Rock Art Project, from 1984 to 1989, eighty‑four stone statues or tiki were documented in seventeen valleys on the presently six inhabited islands. Figure 1. The Marquesas Archipelago, French Polynesia Figure 1. The Marquesas Archipelago, French Polynesia Zoom in Original (png, 48k) © Map courtesy Melinda Allen 2016 2 Their work was published in 2007 by Service de la Culture et du Patrimoine, Mi (...) 3Since 1998, additional sculptures have been found and documented by others. For instance, the French couple Catherine Chavaillon and Eric Olivier, while living on Hiva Oa, recorded several previously undocumented statues2. 3 In the 1890s a large anthropomorphic head was taken from Me’ae Iipona, Puamau, Valley, (...) 4In 1997, the American archaeologist Barry Rolett, with University of Hawaii, Manoa, discovered four tiki heads on the surface of a shrine (me’ae) in Vaitahu, Tahuata. Several sculptures are located in Musée de Tahiti et des îles, Punaauia in numerous museums worldwide as well as in private collections. None of these anthropomorphic figures are included in this study. Some statues have been carried away by foreigners or they were hidden by Marquesan when Christianity became established in the archipelago.3 4 A stone monument in Vaitahu, Tahuata, raised in 1995 in commemoration of the discovery o (...) 5The first encounter between Europeans and Te Enana, as the Marquesan people now wish to be called, was brief and brutal.4 In July 1595, the Spanish commander Alvaro de Mendaña and his pilot Portuguese Pedro Fernández de Quiros came upon Fatu Hiva, Tahuata, Hiva Oa, and Montane islands in the southern group, on their way from Peru to form a colony in the Solomon Islands. Te Enana then became the first Polynesian island society to be discovered by the Europeans. During their visit to Vaitahu, Tahuata, Mendaña and his crew held a Mass, raised three wooden crosses, planted a few corn seeds, and took possession of the island in the name of Spain. Due to misunderstandings between Te Enana and the Spanish some two hundred islanders were massacred. Only Quiros left a record of what they saw during their sojourn in the islands. His account contained the first description of anthropomorphic sculptures and a sacred structure: 5 Markham, 1904, p. 27‑28. Apart from the village there was an oracle surrounded by palisades, with the entrance on the west side. Within there was a house, almost in the middle, in which were wooden figures badly carved; and here were offerings of food and a pig, which the soldiers took. When the Spanish soldiers attempted to take some of the objects, they were made to understand by the Enana that they had great respect for the place.5 6As far as the written record is concerned, no Europeans visited the islands during the following 179 years. Western influence first spread after Captain James Cook’s three‑day visit in 1774. Cook, commander of the Resolution and the Discovery, also anchored in Vaitahu Bay, Tahuata. 7He renamed it Resolution Bay. From then on numerous explorers, missionaries, traders and a few beachcombers arrived in the archipelago. Thus, the Marquesan social fabric dramatically changed forever. Anthropomorphic Sculptures (Tiki) Characteristics 8All representations of human like figures such as the statues, anthropomorphs seen in the petroglyphs, pictographs and tattoo repertoire, carved figures on bones, wood and shells are collectively referred to as tiki. This, however, does not mean that they represent the god Tiki, an important figure in Marquesan mythology. In general, the anthropomorphic statues represent deified ancestors such as important chiefs and priests, people that were considered sacred or tapu. For instance, Takai’i, at Me’ae Iipona, Puamu, Hiva Oa, the largest tiki in the Marquesas, was a powerful chief and warrior. Figure 2. Me'ae Iipona, Puamau, Hiva Oa. Takai’i and a sitting tiki Figure 2. Me'ae Iipona, Puamau, Hiva Oa. Takai’i and a sitting tiki Zoom in Original (jpeg, 1,1M) © Millerstrom Location 9Of the 84 stone anthropomorphic sculptures that we documented, the majority, 53 tiki (63,1 percent), were found on Hiva Oa (Table 1). At Me’ae Iipona, there are 18 tiki (5 statues, 10 heads, and three sculpture fragments), as well as numerous boulders with petroglyphs. Several of the heads were uncovered in 1991 when the French archaeologist Pierre Ottino and his crew restored the site for the Third Marquesas Islands Festival. The only sitting tiki recorded by us is located at this site (see figure 2). The sitting tiki, named Te aua ehu ehu or Fau poe, is believed to represent the wife of Takai’i, the tallest tiki in the Marquesas. Island Valley Frequency of tiki Percentage Hiva Oa Puamau 30 ‘Atu’ona 9 Hanaiapa 3 Eiaone 3 Ta’a Oa 2 Tahauku 2 Mutu Ua 2 Hanapa’ao’a 1 Punaei 1 Subtotal 53 63.1 Nuku Hiva Taipivai 12 Hatiheu 4 Anaho 1 Taiohae 4 Subtotal 21 25.0 Ua Huka Hane 4 Vaipaee 1 Hokatu 1 Subtotal 6 7.1 Tahuata Vaitahu 1 Subtotal 1 1.2 Ua Pu Hakamoui 1 Hakatehau 1 Subtotal 2 2.4 Fatu Hiva Omoa 1 Subtotal 1 1.2 Total 84 100 6 One of the “horizontally placed” tiki is located at Me’ae Iipona. In the 1 (...) 10A total of 48 tiki were documented in situ; the remaining 36 sculptures had been relocated, and their exact original location and archaeological contexts are uncertain. Based on morphology, five main categories are distinguished: 1) statue carved in the round; 2) modified boulder; 3) rectangular block with tiki figure in deep bas‑relief; 4) double figure; and 5) exotic figure. The last category includes two separate horizontally placed tiki resting on blocks and one seated figure (mentioned above).6 The most common visual characteristics are large circular eyes, wide nose, mouth, slightly flexed legs, and arms placed on a protruding stomach. It may include intricate facial features, tattoos, and headbands, while the rest of the body is only roughly outlined. 7 Millerstrom, 2003a, p. 103‑110. 11Tiki are associated with shrines (me’ae), chief’s household units, or ritual places located within the tribal communal complexes (tohua). Tiki may also be linked to fishing shrines (Figure 3). We found a small tiki on the surface of a fishing shrine in Anaho, Nuku Hiva.7 At Paepae Paeke, Nuku Hiva, another site with several tiki, the statues are fully carved and placed on or in the walls of platforms. Figure 3. Anaho, Nuku Hiva. Tioka Puhetini with a tiki discovered on Me’ae Atatai, a fisherman's shrine (331ANA T‑1) Figure 3. Anaho, Nuku Hiva. Tioka Puhetini with a tiki discovered on Me’ae Atatai, a fisherman's shrine (331ANA T‑1) Zoom in Original (jpeg, 408k) ©Millerstrom 12Regarding the Paepae Paeke site, when German ethnographer von den Steinen visited in the 1890s, he was told that each of the 12 tiki present at the site was named after a district in Taipi Valley. The name of one of the tiki was Puamamau Etua. Furthermore, the Paepae Paeke was protected by a tapu (a spiritual protection). The sacredness of the place, the location on top of a peak, and the name of one tiki indicate that this was a me’ae and that one tiki may represent a deified inspirational priest. When the American archaeologist Ralph Linton examined the site in 1920, his guide claimed that the site was neither sacred nor a shrine and the people of Taipi did not know of any names. 13Sometimes statues are directly associated with a chief’s domestic complex. A chief’s house is sometimes referred to as a me’ae in the historic literature. It is possible that an important chief’s house became so infused with supernatural power after his death that the site became sacred and thus became become a shrine as. This is what might have taken place at Paepae Paeke. Structure 14Typically, the size of the head is one third or more of the body’s height. Because the head was considered sacred and the seat of supernatural power (mana), it was the most important part of the statue. Thus, it was carved with careful attention to the smallest details. It is usually resting directly on square shoulders lacking a neck. A tiki at Me’ae Iipona is unusual because of the small size of the head in relation to the body (Figure 4). It is possible that the original head broke off, and the statue and the head were re‑carved to fit into a smooth groove in the upper torso. Round, large, and bulging eyes are usually encircled with a 1‑2‑cm‑wide raised rim under high‑arched eyebrows. Sometimes the eyes have a raised or incised curved line that bisects them from the outer part of the eye to the inner corner of each eye. Some tiki have circular indented pits indicating the pupils. Figure 4. Me'ae Iipona, Puamau, Hiva Oa Figure 4. Me'ae Iipona, Puamau, Hiva Oa Zoom in Original (jpeg, 418k) © Millerstrom 15A broad nose with wide nostrils fills out most of the centre of the face. The outline of the nose goes upward and connects with the eyebrow. High eyebrows reach down on the outer side of the head and link with the ears, resembling the stems of eyeglasses. A long, wide mouth, sometimes with a protruding tongue or even teeth with great canines, covers the lower part of the face. When tattoo occur, they depict anthropomorphic figures, dogs, and geometric motifs. Tattoo are usually placed on the side of the mouth chest or on the thighs. 8 Linton, 1925, p. 74. 16Carved headdresses (hei) are the most common form of decoration, but wreath around the neck, tattoo, short mantles, and hair‑knots on each side of the head occur. Some tiki have drilled circular perforation in the earlobes for placement of earplugs. Takai’i at Me’ae Iipona, has tattoo on the chest and legs, what appears to be a hair knot at the back, and we noted several vertical grooves in each eye, perhaps this was to emphasize their size and the direction of the gaze. The American archaeologist Ralph Linton8 mentions ornamental grooves, circles and chevron patterns on the abdomen and buttocks on some images, but these tattoo design are no longer visible on the tiki we recorded. We do not know if the neck ornaments represent plants or marine material. Perforated shell tabs, pearl pendants, fish, porpoise and whale teeth are found in archaeological deposits. In fact, whale teeth were so treasured that towards the beginning of the Classical Period (1600‑1790) and onwards imitation whale teeth were carved from the lips of Cassi shell. Wreaths of perishable plant material are difficult to ascertain archaeologically. Paul Pétard (1912‑1980), a French ethnobotanist, reported that garlands were strung from the keys of Pandanus (Pandanus tectorius), also referred to as Screw Pine, to decorate the body during feasts. Several varieties of the Pandanus were recognized by the Polynesian according to the various parts of the tree, and the changing colour of the ripening fruit. Garlands strung from the Pandanus keys, especially the red type (ha’a kua), was reserved for garlands to decorate the tiki during feasts and hence tapu or forbidden to commoners. 17Wide, rounded hips and short, stubby extend legs rest on a pedestal. Some tiki have a peg base to secure them in the ground. Legs were considered less important and many images have the legs only indicated, while other sculptures are cut off below the waist. Ankles may be indicated by raised circular knobs. Only a few images depict toes. The back is often carved with spines and buttocks even when the statues are fitted into a stone platform. The tiki recorded by our team vary in height from 32.7 to 250 cm above the ground. The majority of the statues measure between 50 and 100 cm. 18During some ceremonies, the tiki was girdled in tapa or bark clothes. While tapa beating was usually done by women, the loincloth for the tiki were ceremonially beaten by the priest. Early explorers describe old inspirational priests (tuhuna/tuhuka) beating loincloth for the gods. The act was so sacred that the priest could only eat in the evening. Offerings of human victims, animals, fruit, and vegetables were placed in front of the statue or hung in nearby trees. Contributions were placed near the tiki and priest were seen presenting food to the mouth of the statues. Robarts, an English beachcomber that lived eight years in the islands noted that during the memorial feast, food was always sent to the priests at the me’ae. A small portion of the food was placed on the head of the image. Edward Robarts wrote: “This no one eats, being held sacred” (1974). Several of the images we documented have a flat surface on top of the head which may have been a space to place decoration such as a crown of shell, teeth, bones, or plant material as well as offerings to the ancestors. 9 Quoted from E. S. Handy (1923, p. 224) in The Native Culture in the Marquesas: Bernice (...) 19Hands with fingers are most often resting on a protruding abdomen. As ritual knowledge, genealogy and oral tradition were believed to be held in the stomach, hands placed on a protruding belly may have been a way to protect these memories. A tiki, part of Tohua Pehe Kua, Puamau, have the left hand touching the mouth (Figure 5). The reason for this is unknown. At Me’ae Iipona, a headless tiki placed on a terrace below Takai’i has 6 fingers on each hand also resting on a protruding stomach. A circular tattoo on the left ankle indicates that it is a high raking person. A tribal inspirational priest or shaman was called tau’a. Sometimes they would also be called atua (called etua in the Southern group), which means literally god. A shaman could be a male or female. He or she was thought to be persons who could be possessed by spirits or gods and their position were demonstrated by some type of phenomenon or “distinguished by remarkable physical deformity of some kind”.9 This statue is the only one we recorded that showed deformity, although a tiki located at Paepae Paeke, Nuku Hiva, has two heads. However, double‑headed tiki or the Janus figure phenomena seen elsewhere in Polynesian carvings may have different connotations. Figure 5. Tohua Pehe Kua, Puamau, Hiva Oa. The tiki, one of a pair, is presently located at chief Te Hau Moe’s tomb Figure 5. Tohua Pehe Kua, Puamau, Hiva Oa. The tiki, one of a pair, is presently located at chief Te Hau Moe’s tomb Zoom in Original (jpeg, 40M) © Millerstrom 20It is generally assumed that all the tiki represented men. This may not be the case. Leaving out sculptured heads from the calculation, there are 61 torsos and fully carved tiki. Of these 39 sculptures (64.0 percent) have no sex depicted. While 16 sculptures (26.2 percent) represent males, 6 tiki (9.8 percent) represent females. At Paepae Paeke, Taipivai (Nuku Hiva), 4 of the 12 tiki represent females and 4 are males (Figure 6). In the past all tiki had a name, but most of them are forgotten today. According to legends and local informants the tiki with 6 fingers on with both hands at Me’ae Iipona carries names that are both male and female; Te torae e nohu ua, or Maiauto, or Pete ta mu imui are masculine and feminine names. Thus, the male/female distinctions in carved ancestral figures may or may not have been meaningful to the Marquesan in the past. Figure 6. Paepae Paeke, Taipivai, Nuku Hiva. A female tiki carved in red volcanic tuff Figure 6. Paepae Paeke, Taipivai, Nuku Hiva. A female tiki carved in red volcanic tuff Zoom in Original (jpeg, 2,5M) © Millerstrom Material 10 Millerstrom & Edwards, 1998. 11 Linton, 1925, p. 162. 21A total of 31 tiki (37.0 percent) were carved from sacred red volcanic tuff, but some basaltic tiki were once painted red10. When we used artificial light at night to checked on an image at Me’ae Utukua, Punaei Valley, Hiva Oa, we discovered traces of red pigment around the eyes (Figure 7). Ralph Linton11 saw traces of red pigment in protected parts of a statue at Me’ae Iipona, Hiva Oa. Some of the sculptures, 16 (19.0 percent) in total, were carved in a gray or yellow tuff. The remaining 37 sculptures (44.0 percent) were crafted in basalt. Figure 7. Me’ae Utukua, Punaei Valley, Hiva Oa. Figure 7. Me’ae Utukua, Punaei Valley, Hiva Oa. Zoom in Original (jpeg, 433k) ©Photo courtesy C. Chavaillon and E. Oliver 12 Ibid., p. 8‑9, 164‑165. 13 Ibid., p. 8. 22There are numerous quarries in the Marquesas, but none of them have been investigated. Ralph Linton12 writes that all the “great tiki” at Me’ae Iipona were sculptures with material from the quarry of Teohopuapu, located in a small valley in the stream bed on the south‑western side of Teohovevau, Puamau Valley. Both red and gray tuff are found in the quarry. In the same area there is a 10 feet stratum of gray tuff deposit. The outline of a large block, also called ke’etu, has been removed and an unfinished tiki head is still visible. Linton13 mentioned another quarry in Puamau that were quarried for stones for secular structures and a quarry at Hakahetau, Ua Pou. None of these quarries have been visited by our team. 14 Ibid., p. 74‑75. 23Ralph Linton14 claims that the tuff on Nuku Hiva is coarser than the tuff elsewhere and that the sculptures are “technically inferior to those of Hiva Oa”. This has yet to be confirmed. On the beach of the isolated Ha’ata’ive’a Valley, located on the north coast of Nuku Hiva, there are two quarries one on each side of the bay. On the east side, a 2‑3 m wide, red tuff band is exposed in a cliff, and a cave is situated above. In the cave, approximately 5 m above the ground, two anthropomorphic faces are pecked on the floor (Figure 8ab). Rectangular outlines, the results of removing blocks of red tuff, are visible on the north side of the 2‑3 m tuff deposit. At high tide the area is partly submerged, a rough outlined tiki is still in place. A basalt adze quarry with the remains of a white beach rock pavement is situated across the bay. Figure 8. Ha’atai’ve’a, Nuku Hiva. Two petroglyph faces placed on the floor of a rock shelter (331haa 1) Figure 8. Ha’atai’ve’a, Nuku Hiva. Two petroglyph faces placed on the floor of a rock shelter (331haa 1) Zoom in Original (jpeg, 9,2M) © Millerstrom 15 Linton, 1925, p. 165. 24Numerous rituals took place before cutting trees for canoes or quarry stones for tiki. Most of these are now forgotten. In the Polynesian past, all boulders and stones were embodied with supernatural power, but some were thought to be more powerful or sacred than others. Boulders, like all things in nature, were believed to grow in the same manner as people and plants. Te Enana believed that ke’etu “grows slowly but constantly ‑a quality peculiar to it”.15 In fact, carving of stone was so important that certain rituals were observed while quarrying. Workers had to render themselves tapu and has to avoid women prior to working with stones or their tools would break. Conservation Issues 25The stone sculptures, especially those carved in the coarse and soft red and yellow volcanic tuff, are friable. Deterioration of the sculptures due to the exposure of the environment continuous to be a serious threat to the Marquesan cultural remains. Over the years many discussions considering the best way to preserve the sculptures have taken place, e.g., chemical treatment, replace the original with copies, or cover them with roofs. In 2016, conservation efforts have been implemented at Me’ae Iipona, Puamau, a site that receives a relatively large number of tourists. Thatched roofs have been built over each of the most fragile tiki. This certainly will help to slow the deterioration, but in many respects, it may be too late. Since the early 1980s my team and I have noticed slow deterioration of the tiki especially at Me’ae Iipona and Paepae Paeke. In the 1920‑21, Ralph Linton noticed tattoo patterns on the upper and lower legs of Takai’i, such as herringbone patters on the thigh and horizontal grooves on the lower legs. These figures are no longer visible. When our team recorded Takai’i in 1985, we noted 4 vertical grooves in his right eye and 27 vertical grooves in his left eye. These grooves are now difficult to distinguish. 16 Heyerdahl & Ferdon, 1965, p. 127, plate 40c. 26When the Norwegian Archaeological Expedition excavated at Me’ae Iipona in 1956, they made a complete plaster mold, a total of fifty‑nine parts, of Takai’i16. An identical copy was then made for the Kon‑Tiki Museum, Oslo, Norway. In the 1990s, I contacted Arne Sjølsvold at the Kon‑Tiki Museum and asked him if they still had the plaster mold. The plaster cast was made by archaeologists Sjølsvold and Figueroa, members of the Norwegian Archaeological Expedition. Sjølsvold also excavated Me’ae Iipona. While they searched the museum, no mold was found. Sjølsvold speculated that the pieces were thrown away after the copy for the museum was completed. Discussions Age Determination 17 Heyerdahl, 1965, p. 123‑150. 18 Ferdon, 1965, p. 117‑121. 19 The radio carbon age determination for Paeke is 1516 plus or minus 80 year (...) 27To determine the age of the sculptures is challenging. It appears that the conventional image face was first developed in the petroglyphs system and later became part of the tiki face in the sculptures (Figure 9). According to informants in 1890s who could recite approximately 25 generations, Karl von den Steinen, calculated that Me’ae Iipona was constructed circa 1700‑1750. Excavation in 1956 by members of the Norwegian Archaeological Expedition to Easter Island and the East Pacific, financed and directed by Thor Heyerdahl, yielded three significantly earlier radiocarbon dated from about 1300 to 1700 (uncalibrated) for the site17. At Paepae Paeke, Taipivai, Edwin Ferdon18, also a member of the Norwegian Archaeological Expedition, collected an early radiocarbon date, approximately from 1500‑1600. While these dates indicate the occupation of the sites, it is uncertain if the age determinations reflect the age of the associated sculptures19. Suggs (1961), based on his excavations on Nuku Hiva, suggests that the sculptures were first made around 1600‑1700. Rolett noted that the tiki uncovered in Vaitahu (Tahuata) probably dated to the late prehistoric or early historic period, 1700‑1850. Figure 9: Vaitahu, Taipivai, Nuku Hiva. Two mata or tiki faces (333vai 1) Figure 9: Vaitahu, Taipivai, Nuku Hiva. Two mata or tiki faces (333vai 1) Zoom in Original (png, 30k) © Millerstrom 20 Linton, 1925, p. 167. 28The statues at Paepae Poevau, Puamau Valley, were, according to Ralph Linton20 “among the last products of the Marquesan sculptures tradition and prove conclusively that the art of stone carvings was alive and vigorous at the time of the French conquest”. A pervasive art system 21 Linton, 1923, p. 269. 22 It is assumed that human figures are the most numerous Marquesan design element. This (...) 29Polynesian decorative systems e.g., tiki, petroglyphs, pictographs and tattoo, are pervasive. Ralph Linton21 stated that the Marquesan material culture was homogeneous. For example, human images were more often depicted on all Marquesan media (e.g., houses, canoes, implements, and ornaments) than on the same media in the other Polynesian islands or island groups22. Ruth Greiner (1923) numerically demonstrated that the distributions of design elements and motifs used in carving occurred in more Marquesan media than in the islands on Hawaii, Tahiti, Austral, Tonga, Fiji, Samoa, the Cooks, and New Zealand. Unfortunately, Greiner did not have the opportunity to examine Karl von den Steinen’s (1969(I), 1969(II), 1969(III)) seminal work on Marquesan material art. Von den Steinen’s work would have bolstered Greiner’s argument. 23 Walsh & Biggs, 1966. 24 Millerstrom & Allen, 2006. 25 DeBoer, 1991, p. 157. 26 Crook William, 2007 [1797‑1799]. 30A great number of petroglyph faces, stylistically similar to the faces of the sculptures, are often referred to mata both by the local people and in the literature. Mata is also a word linked to numerous tattoo motifs given to von den Steinen in 1897. Mata, a Proto‑Polynesian taxeme refers to eye and face.23 The word has the same meaning in Tonga, Samoa, the Cooks, Easter Islands and among the Maori. Maka is a Hawaiian cognate. Other glosses for mata include genealogy, clan, tribe, or status lineage. This word is still retained in Polynesian dialects indicate that the face motif is connected with important concepts that go far back in Oceanic history. The pervasive mata motif seen in tiki and petroglyphs is also expressed on the surface of, for instance, stilt holders, calabashes, ear plugs, hair ornaments, bark cloth masks, wooden clubs ivory fan handles and so on, collected in the early historic period. There is also a connection between the decoration on tiki, petroglyphs and tattoo.24 They all show remarkable similarities in their decorative systems. This homogeneous decorative system probably identified and intensified the ideology of a group of people. A pervasive art system, furthermore, promotes and reinforces social solidarity in order to maintain belief systems that bolster the political position of the hereditary chief, priests or warriors. Pervasive decorative organization experience much less rate of change that for example an opposing partitive art system.25 These theoretical perspectives have important implications regarding changes in the Marquesan art system and how these changes reflect social transformation. The emphasis on the mata may also have been a way to memorialize, honour, and venerate ancestors. Concern with genealogy was strong in Polynesia. Genealogy linked people with their ancestors and defined their social position to their chiefs. Genealogies were chanted in rites of adoption, birth of a firstborn, marriages, funerals, and so on. Because the head was considered the seat of mana, ancestral skulls were frequently removed from burials and treated as sacred relics. The similarity of much of the archaeological art may be, in part, because the craft specialist (tohuna), despite unrest and warfare, could safely travel between islands.26 Conclusion 27 A version of this essay was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Easter I (...) 31This brief essay on the Marquesan statues presents metric data and some discussion on the statues linked to sacred structures.27 The similarities seen in Marquesan rock art, tattoo, and material objects suggest that the fundamental principles regarding the symbolic order remained unchanged for a long time. Moreover, the homogeneous decorative system demonstrates that the Marquesan adhered to a common ideology and belief system. Stylistically the Marquesan stone tiki are remarkably similar, obviously following certain social rules. However, numerous variations exist suggesting that each tiki not only symbolized important deceased ancestor but in fact represented a specific ancestor. 32The research discussed above is but a small part of the potential wealth of information still to be gleamed from investigating the tiki. Several issues remain to be examined. For example, although the Marquesan tiki are remarkably homogeneous, attribute variations occur. While I speculate that these variations reflect the individual deified ancestor, the stylistic variations could be due to the individual craft‑person, regional or chronological differences, or perhaps associated with the type of material used. Furthermore, is it possible to identify the sex of the 72.8 percent genderless statues by isolating specific male and female characteristics? Futures tiki studies may involve the examination of quarries, as well as to investigate the source of the tiki. To be able to link the source of the statues to the various quarries may reveal information on, for instance, exchange systems, the distance the statues were transported across a challenging landscape, time and efforts of both manufacturing and transportation, division of labour, the limitation of natural resources, social structure or status involved in the quarrying and the carving of the statues, technology and quality of the material, and, in general, social context. Future projects may, furthermore, include the documentation of the anthropomorphic sculptures in museums worldwide and those that are accessible in private collections. Together with the 84 sculptures recorded by my team it will further our knowledge of the Marquesan cultural heritage. Without a doubt, additional tiki will be discovered in the future during archaeological survey, excavation as well as during road and house constructions. Bibliography Books Crook William P., 2007 [1797‑1799], An Account of the Marquesas Islands 1797‑1799, Haere Po, Tahiti, 215 p. Markham Clements, 1904, The Voyages of Pedro Fernandez de Quiros, 1595 to 1606, 2 vol., The Hakluyt Society, London. Millerstrom Sidsel, 2017, Te Henua Enana; Images and Settlement Patterns in the Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia, 67, Contributions of the Archaeological Research Facility, University of California, Berkeley eScholarship, DOI: https://escholarship.org/uc/item/9v38f0zt. [97809890022-5-7] Robart Edward, 1974, The Marquesan Journal of Edward Robarts 1797‑1824, edited by Dening Greg, University Press of Hawai'I, Honolulu, 360 p. [0708106358] Walsh D. S. & Biggs Bruce, 1966, Proto‑Polynesian Word List i, Linguistic Society of New Zealand, Auckland, 133 p. Papers and contributions to books DeBoer Waren R., 1991, “The Decorative Burden: Design, Medium, and Change”, in Longacre William A. (ed.), 2016, Ceramic Ethnoarchaeology, The University of Arizona Press, Tucson, 318 p. [9780816534791] Ferdon Edwin N., 1965, “Surface Architecture of the Site of Paeke, Taipi Valley, Nuku Hiva”, in Heyerdahl Thor & Ferdon Edwin N. (eds.), Reports of the Norwegian Archaeological Expedition to Easter Island and the East Pacific, vol. ii, School of American Research and Kon‑Tiki Museum, Monograph 24, part. 2. Santa Fe, p. 117‑122. Greiner Ruth H., 1923, Polynesian Decorative Designs, B. P. Bishop Museum, Bernice P. Bishop Museum, Bulletin 7, Honolulu, 358 p. Heyerdahl Thor, 1965, “The Statues of the Oipona Me’ae, with a Comparative Analysis of Possibly Related Stone Monuments”, in Heyerdahl Thor & Ferdon Edwin N. (eds.), Reports of the Norwegian Archaeological Expedition to Easter Island and the East Pacific, School of American Research and Kon‑Tiki Museum, Monograph 24, Vol. ii, part. 2, Santa Fe, p. 123‑151. Linton Ralph, 1925, Archaeology of the Marquesas Islands, B. P. Bishop Museum, Bernice P. Bishop Museum Bulletin 23, Honolulu. Millerstrom Sidsel, 1997, “Carved and painted rock images in the Marquesas Islands, French Polynesia”, Archaeology of Oceania, vol. 32, no 3, p. 181‑196. Millerstrom Sidsel & Edwards Edmundo, 1998, “Stone Sculptures of the Marquesas Islands (French Polynesia)”, in Stevenson Christopher M., Lee Georgia & Morin F. J. (eds.), Easter Island in Pacific Context, South Seas Symposium, University of New Mexico, Easter Island Foundation, Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference on Easter Island and East Polynesia, Albuquerque, p. 55‑62, 402 p. [1880636131] Millerstrom Sidsel, 2006, “Ritual and Domestic Architecture, Sacred Places, and Images in the Marquesas Archipelago, French Polynesia”, in Lilley Ian (ed.), Archaeology of Oceania: Australia and the Pacific Islands, Blackwell Publishing, Malden (Mass.), p. 284‑301, 416 p. [9780631230823] Millerstrom Sidsel & Allen Tricia., 2006, “Carved Images and Punctured Skins: Rock Carvings and Tattoos in the Marquesas Islands”, American Indian Rock Art, IRAC Proceedings, Rock Art World Heritage, American Rock Art Association, vol. 21, p. 131‑138. Notes 1 A publication about a tiki exhibit in 2016, Tahiti, just become available. Tiki. Co‑édition Musée de Tahiti et des Iles et Éditions Au Vent des iles. Polynésie Française, 2017. I did not have an opportunity to examine this publication. 2 Their work was published in 2007 by Service de la Culture et du Patrimoine, Ministère de la Cuture de Polynésie Française, Tahiti, called Le patrimoine archéologique de l’île de Hiva Oa (archipel des Marquises). 3 In the 1890s a large anthropomorphic head was taken from Me’ae Iipona, Puamau, Valley, Hiva Oa, by von den Steinen and his crew. It was brought to Germany and is housed in the Ethnographic Museum, Dahlem. The collection will eventually be relocated to the center of Berlin. In 2019, the Ethnographic Museum and Museum of Asian Art are scheduled to reopen in the Humboldt Forum in the reconstructed Berlin City Palace (Berliner Stadtschloss). 4 A stone monument in Vaitahu, Tahuata, raised in 1995 in commemoration of the discovery of the Marquesas Islands by Europeans has the following inscriptions: “FENUA ENATA TERRES DES HOMMES. En 1595, elle fut appelée Îles Marquises, nom qui la fit connaître au reste du monde. Qu’aujourd’hui le monde connaisse son nom d’origine. VATAHU, Le 29 Juillet 1995”. (Fenua Enata, the land of men. In 1595 she was called the Marquesas Islands, a name that become known to the rest of the world. Today the world knows the original name. Vaitahu, July 29, 1995). Because most of my archaeological field research took place in Nuku Hiva, I use the term Te Enana, the men/people rather than Te Enata, the term used in the southern group. 5 Markham, 1904, p. 27‑28. 6 One of the “horizontally placed” tiki is located at Me’ae Iipona. In the 1990s, to everybody’s surprise, a smaller but similar tiki was found below the site Meaiaute. Meaiaute is a small me’ae located on a peak in Hane Valley, Ua Huka. Three tiki and one slab with petroglyph are placed at the edge of a pavement. It is unknown where on the site the “horizontally placed” tiki was originally placed. 7 Millerstrom, 2003a, p. 103‑110. 8 Linton, 1925, p. 74. 9 Quoted from E. S. Handy (1923, p. 224) in The Native Culture in the Marquesas: Bernice P. Bishop Museum Bulletin 9. Honolulu. 10 Millerstrom & Edwards, 1998. 11 Linton, 1925, p. 162. 12 Ibid., p. 8‑9, 164‑165. 13 Ibid., p. 8. 14 Ibid., p. 74‑75. 15 Linton, 1925, p. 165. 16 Heyerdahl & Ferdon, 1965, p. 127, plate 40c. 17 Heyerdahl, 1965, p. 123‑150. 18 Ferdon, 1965, p. 117‑121. 19 The radio carbon age determination for Paeke is 1516 plus or minus 80 years. The following three dates from Me’ae Iipona are: 1) 1316 plus or minus 100 years; 2) 1497 plus or minus 200 years; 3) 1487 plus or minus 150 years. It should be noted that these dates are uncalibrated and the charcoal samples has not been identified. Furthermore, the dates do not necessary represent the first use of the site nor can we be sure that the dates correspond to the time the tiki were made. 20 Linton, 1925, p. 167. 21 Linton, 1923, p. 269. 22 It is assumed that human figures are the most numerous Marquesan design element. This may be solely due to the fact that human figures are more recognizable. Quantitative analysis of the 3 379 petroglyphs recorded in Hatiheu Valley, Nuku Hiva, demonstrates that abstract geometric figures prevail. As a whole, 998 anthropomorphic figures account for 29,5 percent whereas 2121 petroglyphs or 62,8 percent depict abstract geometric motifs. The situation in the western section, the research area of Hatiheu Valley, show a similar pattern, Millerstrom, 2017. In the painted rock shelters of Eiaone Valley, Hiva Oa, anthropomorphs are represented by 20 figures (18,2 percent), while 50 (45.5 percent) are geometric figures. 23 Walsh & Biggs, 1966. 24 Millerstrom & Allen, 2006. 25 DeBoer, 1991, p. 157. 26 Crook William, 2007 [1797‑1799]. 27 A version of this essay was presented at the Fourth International Conference on Easter Island and East Polynesia. University of New Mexico, Albuquerque, USA, 5‑10 August 1997. It was subsequently published with my colleague Edmundo Edwards in 1998. Millerstrom & Edwards, 1998. List of illustrations Title Figure 1. The Marquesas Archipelago, French Polynesia Credits © Map courtesy Melinda Allen 2016 URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-1.png File image/png, 48k Title Figure 2. Me'ae Iipona, Puamau, Hiva Oa. Takai’i and a sitting tiki Credits © Millerstrom URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-2.jpg File image/jpeg, 1,1M Title Figure 3. Anaho, Nuku Hiva. Tioka Puhetini with a tiki discovered on Me’ae Atatai, a fisherman's shrine (331ANA T‑1) Credits ©Millerstrom URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-3.jpg File image/jpeg, 408k Title Figure 4. Me'ae Iipona, Puamau, Hiva Oa Credits © Millerstrom URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-4.jpg File image/jpeg, 418k Title Figure 5. Tohua Pehe Kua, Puamau, Hiva Oa. The tiki, one of a pair, is presently located at chief Te Hau Moe’s tomb Credits © Millerstrom URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-5.jpg File image/jpeg, 40M Title Figure 6. Paepae Paeke, Taipivai, Nuku Hiva. A female tiki carved in red volcanic tuff Credits © Millerstrom URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-6.jpg File image/jpeg, 2,5M Title Figure 7. Me’ae Utukua, Punaei Valley, Hiva Oa. Credits ©Photo courtesy C. Chavaillon and E. Oliver URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-7.jpg File image/jpeg, 433k Title Figure 8. Ha’atai’ve’a, Nuku Hiva. Two petroglyph faces placed on the floor of a rock shelter (331haa 1) Credits © Millerstrom URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-8.jpg File image/jpeg, 9,2M Title Figure 9: Vaitahu, Taipivai, Nuku Hiva. Two mata or tiki faces (333vai 1) Credits © Millerstrom URL http://books.openedition.org/pressesinalco/docannexe/image/33727/img-9.png File image/png, 30k Author Sidsel Millerstrom University of California, Berkeley, Oceanic Archaeology Lab, Archaeological Research Facilities (ARF) By the same author Petroglyphs of the Society Islands within the Polynesian Rock Art Repertoire in Encyclopédie des historiographies : Afriques, Amériques, Asies, Presses de l’Inalco, 2020 © Presses de l’Inalco, 2020 OpenEdition Books License Textes de stèles de grands moines (Corée) Titres Primordiaux (Amérique latine post‑colombienne)

The ancient Marquesan anthropomorphic sculptures or tiki have received wide attention since they were first noted in 1595. However, they have not been systematically and scientifically studied until 1984. Stylistically the Marquesan stone tiki followed certain social rules with similar characteristics to tattoos and material objects.

More exploration of the dramatic Marquesas. These islands were once the home of tens of thousands of Polynesians, with stone temples and a vibrant culture. Now one finds small, well kempt villages with friendly

SY PISCES 🇺🇸 Mary & Kevin - Antares 44e’

PISCIS-Mary
CATWEAXZLE

SY CATWEAZLE 🇬🇧 Harriet & Russell - Allures 45′

CATWEAZLECATWEAZLE

SY SEAGLUB Chris - Hylas 46′

SEAGLUB Chris
Jackiron

Jackiron at anchor in Atuona, Marquesas, French Polynesia

CONGRATULATIONS

Bravo Zulu

SY JACK IRON Kent & Michele -Valiant 42′

JACK IRON KentJACK IRON Michelle
BRAVO ZULU

5) MONSOON'S TAKE

sandspit and sky

palmfringe and beach

palm fringe and beach

walk about

walkabout

Sunset

SY MONSOON Travis, Yeen Yee, Rowan , Everyn - Fuji 32'

MONSOON Yeen YeeMONSOON CrewMONSOON Crew

6) SAVE THE DATE

NAWI ISLAND 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

MEET THE FLEET CELEBRATION

SWAP STORIES OF A LIFETIME

AUG 26 2023

NAWI ISLAND MARINA
SAVUSAVUS FIJI

Nawi

artists rendering


RSVP NOW
AUG 26 2023

FREE RUM, MUSIC and
BULATASTIC PORK ROAST

Save the date

Saturday AUG 26 ’23
SAVUSAVU FIJI

NAWI ISLAND

Nawi Island is located in the beautiful Fiji Islands.It will feature an International Superyacht Marina, which will have 132 marina berths, including 21 superyacht slips (up to 85m). The marina has been designed and built up to category 5 cyclone resistance rating.

The South Pacific Posse is planning a get together at Nawi on Sept 2nd 2023. A week before the infamous Musket Cove regatta. Nawi will be offering entertainment, markets, kava tasting and discounts on berths, water sport activities, restaurant & bar orders, with Pacific Posse hosting a Pig on the spit and rum delights.

16° 46.5716' S 179° 19.9533' E - Nawi Island Savusavu 🇫🇯 Fiji

NAWI ISLAND

The new and fully serviced marina includes “plug in” services through utility pedestals to water, sewerage pump out, power, fuel & gas facilities, plus 24hr security, complimentary Wifi, a.m.o..

7) OCEAN TACTICS
🌪🌀⛈️🌪️
SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE
WEATHER ROUTING DEAL

OFFSHORE WEATHER ROUTING
John Martin principal of Ocean Tactics has been assisting skippers with weather and passage planning in the Pacific for many years is now an official sponsor of the Pacific Posse.

SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE DEAL

BORA BORA AND BEYOND
HEADING TO NEW ZEALAND ?

For Single passage up to 3,000nm U$ 210 (30 % off)

If you are making more than one passage seasonal routing (30 % off)

Full Season, (3 x Ocean and 4 x coastal passage routing) U$ 397 (30 % off)

https://pacificposse.com/ocean-tactics

JOHN MARTIN

Email: admin@coastalandoffshorecruising.com

WhatsApp / Tel +64 27 242 1088

CONTACT US Email admin@coastalandoffshorecruising.com Contact WhatsApp / Tel +64 27 242 1088 Home The Good Ship ‘Windflower’
JOIN THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE
New Zealand
57 vessels

8) CYCLONE HOLES 🇫🇯 FIJI

Tied up in Mangrroves

From sailingtoday.co.uk

"Winston, a category 5 storm traveling with winds at its center of 163 knots was closer than we wanted, but once communications were lost we didn’t know how close.

By 1800hrs the wind was 40 knots and rising steadily. The sound from the exposed top half of the rigging intensified to a piercing shriek. The dull groan from the hull swelled to a pulsing throb as the gale ripped over us at 100 knots. Il Silenzio was being thrown about in the dark like a drunken cork, but we trusted her steel hull and the preparations we had made.

ZAZOO

Zazoo's João up on the mast in the cyclone hole

Then we waited. More anchor checking. More rope adjustments.

More was to come in the form of an onslaught of rain in dense sheets, with flashes of lightning and crashing thunder. The initial wind direction created a tide surge and this surge, combined with the low spring tide, drained the river. Il Silenzio touched the bottom in the early hours of the morning and at low water was lying on her hull at about 40˚ on a cushion of mud. Even less windage in this position meant greater stability. Sleep was impossible at this angle, so we sat and listened to the drama playing out above us.

As the storm eased towards morning, the tide came in and Il Silenzio popped up. Our fitful dozing drifted into a restless sleep, difficult in 34-degree heat, but possible after a sleepless night. With the worst winds abated by late morning we assessed the damage. No boats had broken free and damage was minimal. Il Silenzio was in good shape, apart from a lawn of shredded mangrove leaves enveloping the deck. Our bolthole had been a good one."

A matrix of ropes reminiscent of spaghetti was the result. With a muddy bottom for good anchoring and a small catchment with not too much runoff, this was an excellent refuge. We filled the dinghy with water for stabilising weight, everything was taken off the deck, the headsail was removed and the mainsail tightly lashed. Then we waited. More anchor checking. More rope adjustments.

A matrix of ropes reminiscent of spaghetti was the result. With a muddy bottom for good anchoring and a small catchment with not too much runoff, this was an excellent refuge. We filled the dinghy with water for stabilising weight, everything was taken off the deck, the headsail was removed and the mainsail tightly lashed.

Nadi Cyclone Gunkhole

Nadi Cyclone Gunkhole
https://pacificposse.com/rivergate-marina-shipyard

SERVICES

  • Official Customs and Quarantine Port of Entry for Australia in Queensland
  • Berths and deep water access for vessels up to 90M
  • 24/7 on-water high-speed fuel facility and fuel bunkering
  • Single and 3 phase power up to 400 amp
  • Secure gated site monitored by patrols, CCTV cameras floodlit at night
  • Clean marina certified
  • Onsite storage

AMENITIES

  • Concierge service 7 days a week
  • Service berths with vehicle access
  • Free Wi-Fi
  • Laundry
  • Washrooms
  • Showers
  • Two Cafes

CONTACT

Alexander Binks

Marketing Coordinator

M +61 (0) 4 5226 3318

T +61 (0) 7 3907 1600

E marketing@rivergate.com.au

https://pacificposse.com/rivergate-marina-shipyard

10) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE
🏆
AWARD CATEGORIES

  • BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT ✔
  • PICTURE OF THE YEAR ✔
  • PACIFIC POSSE YODA OF THE YEAR ✔
  • THE CAPTAIN RON AWARD ✔
  • MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD ✔
  • HIGHEST WIND RECORDED ✔
  • SPIRIT OF EXPLORATION ✔
  • GALLEY GOD(ESS) ✔
  • SPEEDY AWARD
  • GOOD SAMARITAN OF THE YEAR ✔
  • BOAT YOGA POSE OF THE YEAR ✔
  • COURAGE AWARD
SKY POND

WINNER OF THE GALLEY GOD(ESS) AWARD '22 SY SKYPOND

https://www.predictwind.com/datahub-2/

11) MANUAL TRACKING WITH PREDICT WIND

SWITCH OVER

VIA THE OFFSHORE APP

DEADLINE JULY 1 2023

How to use GPS Manual Tracking in the Offshore App.

GPS Manual Tracking using the Offshore App can be achieved on PC, Mac, iOS and Android devices. The screenshots below are taken using a PC computer, the general principle is the same across all devices, but the look of the App may differ slightly to the screenshots below if you are using Mac, iOS or Android

NOTE ; If you have automated GPS tracking set up via a satellite device you cannot manual track as well. You will need to contact our Support Team if you would like to switch from automated to manual tracking.

Predict WInd

Log in to your Offshore App and go to the GPS tracking tab on the left. It should look like this.

green

2. Select the Green Download button on the left. Make sure you have selected GPS tracking. Nothing else needs to be ticked for now.

DOWNLOAD ALL

3. Click through to Next > Download All

DOWNLOAD

4. You should now see yourself off the coast of Africa at 0lat0long in the Default position set for tracking pages. However, you will now be able to see this icon that lets you add a manual GPS location.

 5. Click on it to add your current GPS coordinates and time. Select NOW for the current time. Then select Save Point.

5. Click on it to add your current GPS coordinates and time. Select NOW for the current time. Then select Save Point.

Manual position

6. It will then notify that you have a Tracking Point pending upload/download.

DOWNLOAD

7. Do another Download the same as last time, and your Tracking point will be uploaded and synchronized with the server. Your tracking page will now reflect your updated position for friends, family and fleet to see.

TRACKING

12) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE
FLEET TRACKING

Tracking

13) BOLO ALERT
⚠️

BOLO NE of Marquesas, French Polynesia:

BOLO NE of Marquesas, French Polynesia:

Vessel: "SMILES ROWBOAT", MMSI 338399051, U.S. flag

Aaron Carotta on "Smiles* has lost all power and charging capability. He has no comms nor functional navigation equipment. He is also low on food. He therefore set off his PLB on May 28 at 05°15S 119°00W. It pinged only briefly. There was a second ping received on May 31 with new coordinates of 5° 30.00' S 122° 00.00' W.

The coordinates of the two beacons showed movement of 180 miles @ 266°.

Based on the assumption that Aaron is still rowing, his estimated location could be as far out, on June 7, 2023, 20:56 UTC, as

5° 45.360' S

126° 37.547' W

Aaron's destination is the Marquesas. At the time of last social media update, Aaron communicated his desire to make more southerly and was being hindered by wind and ocean conditions. The bearing from the second ping to the northernmost Marquesas anchorage is 259°. He has a compass to steer by, but no way to know his position.

Please be on the lookout when approaching that area and report any sightings. Anybody who can help search or BOLO for Aaron should FIRST be in touch with JRCC Tahiti AND ALSO with our FB group to ensure good communication/coordination.

Contact info for Tahiti JRCC:

Email: contact@jrcc.pf

Phone: 0068 940 541 616

FB Group to contact: In Search of Adventure Aaron Carotta

https://www.facebook.com/groups/186285441048310/

If you have means to contact other vessels which may be in the area, please send them the above info, or post on the Facebook page above so one of Aaron's team can try to reach them.

BOLO

Those are all the boats in the area, their registration names and radio IDs and which direction and speed they are heading etc. if they all worked together and honed into a predicted location, they could find SMILES hopefully. Difficulty is knowing if he’s rowing or not. Personally Id conserve energy and water and just float as this also means he would be closer to his last known position

BOLO

14) FREE ACCESS TO GOOD NAUTICAL

IF YOU ARE SIGNED UP FOR THE '23 SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE you will be assigned access credentials to GOODNAUTICAL South Pacific regions

 

Good Nautical

CONSIDER MAKING A TAX DEDUCTIBLE DONATION TO GOOD NAUTICAL

https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/goodnautical

https://www.paypal.com/paypalme/goodnautical

New Caledonia 🇳🇨 in Good Nautical

15) HISTORIC PORTS ⚓ OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC

VAVA'U 🇹🇴 TONGA

VAVUA

When Captain James Cook arrived in Tonga in 1773, the local king, or Tu'i Tonga, did not intentionally lie to him. However, there might be some confusion or miscommunication that led to misunderstandings between the two parties.

During Cook's visit, he encountered Fatafehi Paulaho, who claimed to be the Tu'i Tonga, the ruling chief of Tonga. However, Fatafehi Paulaho was not the legitimate Tu'i Tonga but rather a local chief who assumed the title. It is believed that he used the opportunity of Cook's visit to elevate his status and gain recognition.

It's important to note that Tonga had a complex social and political structure at the time, with multiple chiefs and sub-chiefs. The concept of a single, central ruler, like the Tu'i Tonga, held different meanings and roles depending on the period and context.

So, while Fatafehi Paulaho may have presented himself as the Tu'i Tonga and Cook might have believed him initially, it wasn't a deliberate act of deception by the king. It was more likely a result of the complexities of Tonga's social structure and the differences in understanding between the two cultures.

Double-hulled canoes, Tonga

Tonga's ability to resist colonization can be attributed to several factors:

Geographic Isolation
Tonga is located in the South Pacific, which made it relatively isolated from major colonial powers during the era of European colonization. The distance and lack of easily accessible resources reduced the incentive for colonizers to establish a permanent presence in Tonga.

Strong Monarch
Tonga had a well-established and centralized monarchy, with a long history of rule by the Tu'i Tonga and later the Tu'i Kanokupolu. The monarchy provided a source of stability and authority, allowing the Tongans to maintain a unified front against potential colonizers.

Skilled Navigators
Tongans had a strong tradition of navigation and seafaring. They were adept sailors and had developed sophisticated navigation techniques, allowing them to explore and interact with other Pacific islands. This expertise and knowledge of the seas might have made potential colonizers wary of engaging with Tonga.

Diplomacy & Negotiation
Tonga had a tradition of diplomatic relationships with foreign powers. Tongan leaders, such as King George Tupou I, engaged in diplomatic negotiations with European powers, establishing treaties that recognized Tonga's independence and sovereignty. These treaties, along with Tonga's diplomatic efforts, helped protect the kingdom from colonization.

Internal Unity & Resistance
The Tongan people had a strong sense of cultural identity and unity, which contributed to their ability to resist colonization. There were instances where Tongans actively resisted attempts at colonization, demonstrating their commitment to preserving their way of life and sovereignty.

Tonga was never formally colonized
it did enter into a treaty relationship with Britain in 1900, known as the Treaty of Friendship. Under this treaty, Tonga maintained its independence but recognized Britain's influence in matters of foreign policy and defense. Tonga remains the only Pacific island nation to never have been fully colonized.

Tonga Sailing

Captain Cook and the ‘Friendly Islands’?

Captain Cook first landed in the Tongan islands on 2 October 1773, during his second Pacific voyage. In 1774 he returned for four days and received such a warm welcome that he named Tonga the “Friendly Islands”. However, it is now widely thought that the Tongan chiefs had planned to attack Cook and his crew and seize the Resolution and Adventure.

CAPTAIN COOK

The first account of the supposed plot against the Resolution was given by William Mariner, a young man serving on the British privateer Port au Prince when it was attacked in Lifuka in 1806. Twenty-six of the crew survived. Mariner was adopted by the chief Finau ‘Ulukalala-‘i-Ma‘ofanga and lived in Tonga for four years. |

Finau told Mariner that the “Feenow” Cook had known was his father, who had been instrumental in planning an attack on Cook. The plan was called off when the chiefs disagreed about whether to attack under cover of darkness or during the day.

Fīnau ʻUlukālala I (or his brother) on Vavaʻu in 1793, in Jacques-Julien Houtou de Labillardiere, Voyage in Search of La Perous

Fīnau ʻUlukālala I (or his brother) on Vavaʻu in 1793, in Jacques-Julien Houtou de Labillardiere,

When Mariner returned to London, he was contacted by John Martin, an ethnographically-minded doctor. Together they authored An Account of the Natives of the Tonga Islands (1817), one of the most accurate accounts of Tongan life in the early 19th century. In the opinion of most scholars, Mariner’s account is accurate. So was the plot to kill Cook in Tonga real, and was Cook so naïve as to be oblivious to the danger? There are some factors to take into account.

When the Port au Prince was attacked in 1806, Tonga had been in the grip of civil war for seven years. The prosperous and scattered people Cook had observed were corralled inside guarded fortresses and slowly starving as harvest after harvest was destroyed by neglect and attacking armies. The different island groups were controlled by warring chiefs, each aware of the advantage which possession of European firearms and iron goods would afford them in their political and economic struggles.

The outbreak of the civil war had very little to do with European arrivals. Tensions between the three chiefly lineages holding spiritual, administrative and political authority had been mounting for nearly two decades, and came to a head with the assassination of chief Tuku‘aho in 1799. By the time Mariner was living with Finau ‘Ulukalala-‘i-Ma‘ofanga, it was deemed expedient to have a European or two to assist in battles, and as a kind of status symbol.

Tonga. Natche, Ceremony in Honour of King's Son. Cook c1784 by Cook, Captain James The Natche, a Ceremony in Honour of the King's Son, in Tongataboo - a grand and reverent ceremony.

Original copperplate engraving after the drawing by the Admiralty-appointed official artist on the voyage, John Webber (1751-1793). This engraving is part of a series of 78 plates, based on Webber's drawings to include indigenous people, artifacts and views. It was published for Anderson’s “Complete History of Captain Cook's First, Second and Third Voyages” published in London published by Alexander Hogg circa 1784.

HIS MAJESTY KING TUPOU VI OF TONGA Born ‘Aho‘eitu ʻUnuakiʻotonga Tukuʻaho, on 12 July 1959 in Nuku’alofa, he is the 3rd son and youngest of four children of Their late Majesties King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV and Queen Halaevalu Mata’aho.

HIS MAJESTY KING TUPOU VI OF TONGA

Born ‘Aho‘eitu ʻUnuakiʻotonga Tukuʻaho, on 12 July 1959 in Nuku’alofa, he is the 3rd son and youngest of four children of Their late Majesties King Taufa’ahau Tupou IV and Queen Halaevalu Mata’aho.

‘Aho’eitu ‘Unuaki ‘o Tonga Tuku’aho received three chiefly titles as is customary in the Tongan tradition, He commonly used these titles Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata, until he became Crown Prince.

Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata was educated at The Leys School, Cambridge then attended the University of East Anglia in 1980 where he graduated with a degree in Development Studies.

Upon returning to Tonga in 1982, the young prince joined the Navy at the Tonga Defence Services and gaining promotion to Lieutenant-Commander in 1987.

He graduated from the US Naval War College in 1988 and from 1990 to 1995 he took command of the Pacific-class patrol boat VOEA Pangai and led peace keeping missions in Bougainville.

In 1997, he graduated with a Masters in Defence Studies from the University of New South Wales and in 1999 he earned a MA in International Relations from Bond University, Australia.

Prince ‘Ulukalala Lavaka Ata joined the civil service in 1998 occupying two portfolios, Minister for Defence and Minister for Foreign Affairs. He was appointed Prime Minister from January 2000 to February 2006. Later that year he received the title Crown Prince Tupouto’a Lavaka when his elder brother became King George Tupou V.

In 2008, the Crown Prince was appointed Tonga’s first High Commissioner to Australia and Ambassador to Japan until his succession to the Throne in 2012, when his brother King George Tupou V passed away and immediately became King and Head of State.

His Majesty Tupou VI was formally crowned King in July 2015 in a series of ancient private and public ceremonies and religious services attended by both regional and global leaders who travelled to Tonga for this special occasion.

His Majesty married Nanasipauʻu Vaea on 11 December 1982 who his accession to the Throne became Her Majesty Queen Nanasipauʻu Tukuʻaho of Tonga.

16) MEET OUR SPONSORS

  • PREDICT WIND
  • PANAMA CANAL AGENT ERICK GALVEZ CENTENARIO CONSULTING
  • YACHT AGENTS GALAPAGOS
  • YACHT AGENTS NUKU HIVA
  • SAIL TAHITI
  • OCEAN TACTICS | PACIFIC WEATHER ROUTING
  • SHELTER BAY MARINA PANAMA
  • DENARAU MARINA FIJI
  • NAWI ISLAND MARINA
  • VUDA POINT MARINA
  • MUSKET COVE MARINA
  • COPRA SHED MARINA FIJI
  • CLOUD 9
  • PUERTO AMISTAD ECUADOR
  • RIVERGATE MARINA AUSTRALIA
  • MARSDEN COVE MARINA NEW ZEALAND
  • GULF HARBOUR MARINA NEW ZEALAND
  • YACHTING WORLD MARINA PORT VILA VANUATU

ROYAL SUVA YACHT CLUB FIJI 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE PACIFIC POSSE

ROYAL SUVA YACHT CLUB FIJI
🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE PACIFIC POSSE

WE OPERATE UNDER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW

YOUR VESSEL YOUR CREW YOUR RESPONSIBILITY

South Pacific Posse

 

south pacific posse communications
@ 9811 w charleston blvd 2262 89117 Las Vegas USA

 

 


Vuda Point Marina

VUDA POINT MARINA 🇫🇯 FIJI - SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

VUDA POINT MARINA 🇫🇯 FIJI - SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

  • Stay 7 days, Pay for 6
  • $100 discount for haul outs PLUS 2 days on the hardstand
  • One night free with any inward or outward clearance from the country
VUDA MARINA

CONTACT

Adam Wade
adam wade vuda marina
Tel +679 666 8214
Email: adam@vudamarina.com.fj
Web http://www.vudamarina.com/

RATES

LOW SEASON
CYCLONE SEASON
1s t November - 30th April
HIGH SEASON
SAILING SEASON
1st May - 31s t October
x ft x day 1.25 1.5
x ft x month 25 30
**includes electricity, water, 1 hr wifi per day & free ice
(subject to availability)
**Vuda Marina does not charge a Live Aboard Fee
x ft x day 2 2.5
x ft x month 40 50
MULTIHULL
x ft x day 3.5 4.5
x ft x month 70 80
**hardstand includes up to 8 stands/ props. $5 per day for
additional stand/ props
**minimum stands/ props at travelift operators discretion
**25% surcharge applies for subsequent months after the
second month on the hardstand
TRAVEL LIFT
Haul out (includes Re-launch)
< 2 t                                                         350                                                                   450
2 - < 10t                                                         450                                                                   550
10 - <20t                                                         550                                                                   650
20 - <30t                                                         650                                                                   750
30 - <40t                                                         800                                                                   900
40 - < 50t                                                     1,200                                                               1,450
50 - 63t MAX                                                     2,500                                                               3,000
Crane x hour                                                         200                                                                   250
**Extra Moves (ie from Cyclone Pit to Hardstand) 50% off
**Lift and Hold (per hour or part thereof) 50% off
all prices in FJD all prices in FJD
IMPORTANT TO NOTE:
All rates will be charged in $FJD and are exclusive of government taxes and charges.
US Dollars are indicative only. Berthing payments are not berth specific. Vessels with a beam 16’ and over are charged 150% of the above inwater berthing rates and vessels with a
beam 24’ and over are charged 200% of the above inwater berthing rates. Weekly and monthly rates only available if paid in advance. Failure to pay in advance will result in daily
rate being charged until paid up to date. Invoices not paid after 30 days will incur a 7.5% late payment fee until fully paid. Free power is limited to normal supply through a 10amp
plug. Aircon units or power tools subject to review by Marina management.
**Travelift Surcharge – After Hours, Sundays or public holiday: $300.00 per 2 hours (US$140.00) or part thereo
MULTIHULL TRAILER
Haul out (includes Re-launch)
< 2 t                                                         950                                                               1,150
2 - < 10t                                                     1,250                                                               1,450
10 - <20t                                                     1,750                                                               1,950
20 - <30t                                                     2,250                                                               2,450
30 - <40t max                                                     2,950                                                               3,150
**Cat lift includes 2 days on the hardstand for free
**If your vessel requires an extra move you will only be
charged 50% of these rate
all prices in FJD all prices in FJD
CRADLES PER UNIT
per week 60 50
per month 180 150
CYCLONE PITS
per L OA foot (minimum 35 ’) 250 18
PER SEASON X FT  NOV 1  -APR 30 PER MONTH x foot
Pay in full for your cyclone season pit before 31st March
& receive 20% off
A non-refundable deposit of $1,500 is required to
secure a pit.
All cyclone season pits must be paid in full by
15th September or they will be offered to the next
yacht on the waitlist.
Yachts in the pits during Sailing Season MUST be
removed by 15th October or they will be charged as a
cyclone pit.
Additional stays less than 1 month during sailing season
are charged at daily hardstand rate.
All rates will be charged in $FJD and are exclusive of government taxes and charges.
US Dollars are indicative only. Berthing payments are not berth specific. Vessels with a beam 16’ and over are charged 150% of the above inwater berthing rates and vessels with a
beam 24’ and over are charged 200% of the above inwater berthing rates. Weekly and monthly rates only available if paid in advance. Failure to pay in advance will result in daily
rate being charged until paid up to date. Invoices not paid after 30 days will incur a 7.5% late payment fee until fully paid. Free power is limited to normal supply through a 10amp
plug. Aircon units or power tools subject to review by Marina management.
**Travelift Surcharge – After Hours, Sundays or public holiday: $300.00 per 2 hours (US$140.00) or part thereof

 

LOCATION

WEBSITE >>

Vuda Marina

GALLERY


SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE & NAWI ISLAND MARINA PARTY AUG 26 2023

RSVP REQUIRED  PLEASE FILL OUT THE FORM BELOW
i.e. San Francisco, CA
If you request a slip NAWI ISLAND MARINA WILL CONTACT YOUR DIRECTLY

default

SAU BAY MOORINGS AND DIVE CENTER

SAU BAY RESORT & SPA - MOORINGS AND DIVE CENTER 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

SAU BAY RESORT & SPA - MOORINGS AND DIVE CENTER 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE
Sau Bay Moorings

Bula we welcome you to out lovely facilities in paradise and invite you to stay ... forever

TO WELCOME THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE YOU CAN STAY ON OUR MOORINGS - first night is free !

Eunice

Eunice Resort Manager

Drinks at Sau bay

SERVICES

Moorings  $10 x day  $ 50 weekly
Moorings up to 32’ (12,000 lbs)
Depth: 40-90 feet

  • 21+ AMAZING DIVE SITES – INCLUDING THE COVETED “GREAT WHITE WALL”
  • HOUSE REEF FOR SNORKELING AND DIVING
  • ORGANIZED DAY TRIPS (TAVEUNI ISLAND, VILLAGE TOURS, MANTA RAY SNORKEL)
  • DIVE INSTRUCTION AND CERTIFCATION (PADI FACILITY) WITH HIGH QUALITY GEAR
  • HIGH END RESTAURANT
  • WATERFRONT PRIVATE DINING VALE
  • CULTURAL DINNER EXPERIENCE (LOVO, MEKE AND KAVA CEREMONY)
  • FULL BAR
  • SHOWERS
  • DELUXE WATERFRONT BURES WITH INDOOR/OUTDOOR SHOWERS
  • FULL SERVICE OVERWATER SPA
  • 100 ACRES OF RAINFOREST TO EXPLORE

Bures
AMENITIES

Water
Rubbish Bins & Recycling
Electricity
Fuel (Coordinate prior to arrival)
PADI Dive Center with high quality gear rental and experienced local divemasters
Dive Compressors
WIFI

SAU BAY
CONTACT

Leo Rebele

Sau Bay Resort & Spa
Box 62, Waiyevo Fiji Islands

Tel: / Whatsapp +1 (562) 761-9191

Resort Tel +679 603-1003

info@divesaubay.com

www.divesaubay.com

SAFE APPROACH

 

 

 


RATES

https://www.divesaubay.com/general-4

LOCATION

 

OFFICIAL WEBSITE >>
sau bay official website

2022 DIVES BY SY DREAMER


Sunset Ibex

FLEET UPDATE 2022-07-01

South Pacific Posse

>

SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE 
FLEET UPDATE 

July 1, 2022

1) THE FLEET CONTINUES WESTWARD 

2) KIRIBATI OPENS UP 

 
 
 

South Pacific Posse 13 Particpant Flag States

1) GO WEST 

As French Polynesia's 90 day visas end the fleet is making it's way out of
French Polynesia - Cook Islands, American Samoa, etc etc QUICK FACT -
There are 10,000 more islands beyond Bora Bora in the South Pacific

 

SOUTH PACIFIC FLEET UPDATE LOCATION 2022-07-01

2)  KIRIBATI 🇰🇮 OPENS UP 

Kiribati

The Government of Kiribati announced, that all international travel to and
from Kiribati will return to normal on the 1st of August, 2022.

Kiribati

The official announcement also confirmed that the Government of Kiribati
has reduced the compulsory in-country quarantine days for all travelers
from seven (7) to three (3) days. 

Kiribati border reopening announcement

Kiribati is not another Tahiti, Hawaii, etc. It has very few visitors, and they
have to be prepared to "rough it." That said, there aren't many
countries where the people are more friendly.

Kiribati Location

KIRIBATI is an island group in Micronesia straddling the equator with 33 atolls.
Kiribati saw some of the worst fighting of the Pacific theater during
the Second World War, including the infamous Battle of Tarawa in
November 1943.

KIRIBATI

3) PICTURES OF THE WEEK

Blue Heeler

Blue Heeler's Rainbow

Blue Heeler

SY BLUE HEELER 🇦🇺 Alison & Wayne - Hallberg Rassy 39'

BLUE HEELER WayneBLUE HEELER Alison

4) CROSSING THE DATELINE 180° MERIDIAN 🇫🇯  FIJI 

Boat Yoga

Taveuni is the third-largest island in Fiji. The cigar-shaped island, a massive
shield volcano which rises from the floor of the Pacific Ocean across
the Somosomo Strait

Bula from Paradise Resort on Taveuni! This month I have made new tracks from Denarau to Yadua to Savusavu to Viani to Taveuni. I've just uploaded them to the Dropbox folder for your consumption. In the next few weeks I'll make my way to Fulaga, Kadavu and Beqa and share those tracks when I can. Safe sailing!

Bula from Paradise Resort on Taveuni!  This month I have made new
tracks from Denarau to Yadua to Savusavu to Viani to Taveuni.  In
the next few weeks I'll make my way to Fulaga, Kadavu and Beqa and share
those tracks when I can. 

TAVEUNI IS IN GOOD NAUTCIAL

Yes Anchorages on and near Taveuni, Fiji  are in GOOD  NAUTICAL 

Taveuni Straight

The waters in the Somosomo Strait are subject to powerful currents as a
vast amount of nutrient-rich ocean water that fuels the region's
astonishing coral growth.  

WHite Wall

The Rainbow Reef on the edge of Taveuni is one of the most famous dive
sites in the South Pacific. The Great White Wall is named because of the
white coral inhabiting the area at depths between 49 and 213 ft

Rainbow Reef

This is also a hotspot for bigger species of marine life, with plenty of
schooling fish, sharks and manta rays during the season.

Dive Sites

SY  SEAGLUB 🇺🇸 Chris - Hylas 46′

5) IBEX' LAST WEEKS IN 🇵🇫 FRENCH POLYNESIA 

IBEX

Gold at the end of the Rainbow

Cooks Bay

Cooks Bay - Mo'orea FP

Moorea

Our current anchorage in MO'OREA Cook's Bay FP named after James Cook, despite that he never sailed into here 

Sunset

Sunset Alert 

Fuel Dock Marina Tahina

Fuel Prices will go up 24 % this weekend in French Polyneisa 

Huahine

Island of HUAHINE - French Polynesia 

Huahine

The important thing: once a year the pastor has to bless the vanilla plants - or so I understood with my non existent French

The important thing: once a year the pastor has to bless the vanilla plants - or so I understood with my non existent French

Vanilla Plants in Huahine

Vanilla

Vanilla is a spice derived from orchids of the genus Vanilla. Pollination is
required to make the plants produce the fruit. In 1841, Edmond Albius, a
12-year-old slave child who lived on the French island of Réunion in
the Indian Ocean, discovered that the plant could be
hand-pollinated. 

Vanilla

Three major species of vanilla currently are grown globally, all of which
derive from a species originally found in Mesoamerica.  Hernán
Cortés is credited with introducing both vanilla and chocolate to Europe
in the 1520s. In Europe, vanilla was seen mostly as an additive to
chocolate until the French starting using vanilla to flavor ice cream.

Mont Orohena is a mountain located in the South Pacific, on the island of Tahiti. With an elevation of 2,241 metres (7,352 ft)[2] above sea level, it is the highest point of French Polynesia. Mont Orohena is an extinct volcano

The seed pods are gathered up when mature and exposed to the heat of the
tropical sun, or sometimes steamed in modern production. This damages
the pods' cell walls, and the resulting chemical reactions brown the
pods and create the signature vanilla flavor.

View

View of Mo'orea from Tahiti

Dance

We just watched a Heiva dance presentation 

We just watched a Heiva dance presentation in Bora Bora. If you come this way in July, above is the program.

If you come this way in July, above is the program.

We just watched a Heiva dance presentation in Bora Bora

The Heiva  is an expression of Polynesian culture.  The mythical
stage, the venue for this cultural event, will host song and dance
groups

Bora Bora

During World War II, the United States chose Bora Bora as a South Pacific
military supply base, and constructed an oil depot, an airstrip, a
seaplane base, and defensive fortifications. The base, known as "Operation Bobcat", comprised nine ships, 18,000 t of equipment, and nearly 7,000 soldiers. 

Roast Suckling Pig

Roast Suckling Pig  - traditional fare from Polynesian culture.  

SY IBEX 🇦🇹  Florian & Vicky- Sunbeam 42′

IBEX VickyIBEX Florian

7) PICTURE OF THE WEEK 

OHANA

SY OHANA at anchor in Bora Bora, French Polynesia  

Picture of Ohana haulout in Raiatea Carenage

Picture of Ohana haulout in Raiatea Carenage French Polynesia

 

SY OHANA 🇺🇸  Aisling & Darryl  - Lagoon 46′

OHANA AislingOHANA Darryl

8) DRIFT DIVE FAKARAVA  🇵🇫 FRENCH POLYNESIA 
 

Had a amazing dice at the south pass of fakarava for the full moon! Thousands of grouper!

Had a amazing dice at the south pass of Fakarava for the full moon! Thousands of grouper!

We Sail

Wesail's youtube chanel https://www.youtube.com/c/WEsail/videos

Tetamanu Village south pass Fakarava

Tetamanu Village south pass Fakarava

Pass Drive

SY VA / WESAIL  🇵🇦  Erica & Warren - Fountaine Pajot 44′

VA

9) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE 
AWARDS CATEGORIES 

 

HERE ARE THE  CATEGORIES 

    BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT* ✔ 

    PICTURE OF THE YEAR ✔  

    SPEEDY AWARD – SEVENSTAR AWARD ✔  

    THE CAPTAIN RON AWARD ✔ 

    MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD ✔ 

    HIGHEST WIND RECORDED ✔ 

    SPIRIT OF EXPLORATION ✔ 

    GALLEY GOD(ESS) ✔ 

    GOOD SAMARITAN OF THE YEAR ✔  

    NEWLY ADDED – BOAT YOGA POSE OF THE YEAR ✔

*no bill-fish

Sunsets in Vauatu

Vanuatu awaits

10) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE WEATHER ROUTING   

Weather Routing

For weather routing  through the dangerous middle toward s New Zealand or Australia please visit our sponsors 
https://pacificposse.com/ocean-tactics

Contact John Martin 
 admin@coastalandoffshorecruising.com

WhatsApp / Tel  +64 27 242 1088

John Martin

John Martin principal of Ocean Tactics has been assisting skippers with weather and passage planning in the Pacific  for many years is now an official sponsor  of the South Pacific Posse.

 Sail South Pacific

11) VUDA MARINA 🇫🇯  FIJI
SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

vUDA MArina

With pleasure we are happy to announce the  Sponsorship of the Pacific Posse

Vuda MARINA

Vuda Marina Savusavu Fiji 

Vuda Marina Fiji’s Favourite Yacht Haven

This  season the South Pacific Posse will have:

20% discount on docks.

Welcome national beer

And access to all facilities.

Regards,

Adam Wade GM

Adam

Adam Wade

Skype i.d: vudamarina

Tel: +679 666 8214  +679 666 8215  info@vudamarina.com.fj

Vitu Levu

12)  MARINA SPONSORS OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC  POSSE 

🇺🇸  Safe Harbor South Bay – Chula Vista - USA

🇲🇽  Marina Chiapas – Mexico   

🇨🇷  Marina Papagayo – Costa Rica   

🇵🇦  Shelter Bay Marina – Panama  

🇪🇨  Marina Puerto Amistad – Ecuador  

🇫🇯   Vuda Point Marina - Fiji 

🇻🇺  Yachting World Marina - Port Vila - Vanuatu

🇳🇿  Marsden Cove Marina - New Zealand 

🇦🇺  Rivergate Marina  - Brisbane  - Australia 

🇫🇯  Denarau Marina - Fiji 

🇫🇯  Royal Suva Yacht Club  - Fiji 

🇫🇯  Savu Savu Marina  - Fiji 

Shelter Bay Marina

Shelter Bay Marina Panama a natural  jump off point for the South Pacific Posse 

13) TRACKING THE 22' PACIFIC POSSE  FLEET 
BROUGHT TO YOU BY PREDICT WIND

Tracking

Visit https://pacificposse.com/tracking to view the progress of the 22 South Pacific Posse Fleet. 
To be added visit https://pacificposse.com/add-to-tracking

Gargolye

SY Gargoyle captured a  sunset with the tip of Bora Bora barely visible on the horizon

SY GARGOYLE 🇨🇦  Kevin & Carla -  Beneteau 50′

GARGOYLE KevinGARGOYL Carla

14) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE SPONSORS 

  • PREDICT WIND
  • SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT
  • CENTENARIO PANAMA CANAL AGENTS
  • YACHT AGENTS GALAPAGOS 
  • YACHT SERVICES NUKU HIVA 
  • NOUMEA YACHT SERVICES
  • SAFE HARBOR SOUTH BAY MARINA EVENT CENTER
  • WESTMARINE PRO
  • SAILMAIL 
  • OCEAN TACTICS WEATHER ROUTING
  • CLOUD 9  FIJI
MARE

15) SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT

 SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

More info on Sevenstar™s services can be found on https://www.sevenstar-yacht-transport.com/

Sevenstar

SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT | JULY 01 2022

🛥️ ⛵ SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC  POSSE

Sevenstar Yacht Transport is proud to continue as a sponsor of the Panama Posse.
True sailing communities with real world cruising experience, such as
the Panama Posse, always inspire us and drives us to provide regular
sailings on established routes as well as expanding into new markets and
ports. Providing professional logistics solutions for sailors and
cruisers all over the world is our core business and the Posse sailing
communities are a true example of what can be possible this day in age
when it comes to flexibility and connectivity. We thank you for the
privilege to be your logistics supplier.

Seven Star

16) PANAMA 🇵🇦 CANAL AGENT 
CENTENARIO CONSULTING ERICK GALVEZ

To arrange for transit with the Panama Canal Authority please contact Eric
Galvez our dedicated Panama Canal agent and sponsor of the Panama Posse
and the Pacific Posse

Erick Gálvez

info@centenarioconsulting.com

www.centenarioconsulting.com

Cellphone +507 6676-1376

WhatsApp +507 6676-1376

Erick
https://panamaposse.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/new-panama-canal-graphic.jpg

17) STRATEGIC PARTNERS
 

SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION

Abernathy – Chandlery – Panama

Panama Posse 

Atlantic Posse

Advertising Partners – Las Vegas

Safe-Esteem.com – Delaware

SIGN UP FOR 
THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE  
New Caledonia

WE OPERATE UNDER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW

YOUR VESSEL · YOUR CREW · YOUR RESPONSIBILITY 

Port Fitzroy, Great Barrier Island, NZ
 

South Pacific Posse

south pacific posse communications 
 @ 9811 w charleston blvd 2262 89117 Summerlin USA

© 2022 South Pacific Posse / Ocean Posse LLC

 


Dreamer at anchor

FLEET UPDATE 2022-06-13

 

 

South Pacific Posse

 

 

SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE 
FLEET UPDATE 

June 13, 2022

TOP NEWS THIS WEEK

1) VANUATU OPENS UP JULY 1 

2) AMERICAN SAMOA OPENS UP 

3) SOLOMON ISLANDS  OPENING 

 
 
 

 

South Pacific Posse 13 Particpant Flag States

 

1) YACHTING WORLD - PORT VILA  🇻🇺  VANUATU    
SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

The
Vanuatu Tourism Office  is excited to announce that Vanuatu will
open its borders to fully-vaccinated international travelers from 1
July, 2022 with no quarantine or arrival caps.

 

Yachting World

 

Yachting
World’s staff is happy to assist you with the same warm friendliness
that we have been offering cruising yachts for more than 25 years.

 

Port VIla

 

Port Vila - Efate -Vanuatu

Yachting World Marina will - hopefully - open

on August 1st -

 

Best regards - Elsie - YW

Phone + 678 23273

(if a phone call, ask for Lemara, the office manager)

VHF Ch. 16

email: welcome@yachtingworld-vanuatu.com

 

Vanuatu Chart 82571

 

2)  AMERICAN SAMOA 🇦🇸 OPENS UP 

American Samoa - Pago Pago

American Samoa - Pago Pago Harbor

Talofa lava South Pacific Posse,

 

Please,
note that American Samoa is currently under a Declaration of Public
Health Emergency for COVID-19 and strict travel restrictions have been
implemented. You can find more information on this website:
www.legalaffairs.as.gov, under "Travel Restrictions" for further
information.

 

In
addition, we will need detailed information regarding the vessel and
crew, and the nature of the vessel's request to enter American Samoa.
Please provide the following information:

 

    ETA:

    Vessel Registration Number

    Vessel Type/Specifications/Color

    Vessel Flag

    Vessel Home Port

    Vessel contact information: email, radio call sign, satellite phone/Inmarsat

    Crew List

    Copies of Crew Passports

    Copies of COVID19 Test results

    Clearance documents from the last port

    Where was the vessel scheduled to go upon departing the last port?

    Cargo Manifest

 

Kindly
submit this information for review.  Understand that this request
for additional information IS NOT an authorization to enter American
Samoa.  The vessel is to remain outside of Territorial waters until
further instructions are given.  As soon as I receive this
information, I will send the request up to the proper authorities for
approval.

 

Let me know if you should have further questions in regard to this matter.

 

Respectfully,

Chester Manaea

chester.manaea@pa.as.gov

Pago Pago Harbor

3) SOLOMON ISLANDS 🇸🇧 OPENING 

Honoria Harbour

Honoria Harbour - Solomon Islands 

The information on this page is applicable to people who are fully vaccinated and traveling from Fiji to Solomon Islands.

 Travel is allowed with restrictions for vaccinated travelers

 Fully
vaccinated travelers aged 18 years and older are allowed to enter the
Solomon Islands under the tourism bubble. Travelers must contact
jremobatu@pmc.gov.sb or Cornelius.Walegerea@mfaet.gov.sb to get approval
from Oversight Committee to enter the country.

Please check the documentation, quarantine, and/or testing requirements before traveling.

Unvaccinated
travelers under the age of 18 who are eligible to take their
vaccination can enter Solomon Island; however, they will need to take
vaccination after arrival.

Honoria Chart

4) ENTRY INTO BOAT YOGA AWARD

 

Boat Yoga

 

More boat chores in exotic places. Cleaning the barnacles off the dinghy at 7 knots.

SY  RHAPSODY  🇦🇺  Sarah & Bob
- Jeanneau 49′

RHAPSODY BobRHAPSODY Sarah

5) SUPPLY CHAIN 102 & ROAD TRIP
PAPEETE MARKET 🇵🇫 FRENCH POLYNESIA 

After the Tuamotus, Papeete market is a fruit & vegetable paradise 😃

Market

Marché Papeete ("municipal market") or Papeete Market is an extensive market place in Papeete, the capital of Tahiti.

Market

The market sells fruit, vegetables, fish, oils, handicrafts and various souvenir items. 

Market 2

We took the cross island 4WD track today

y, it runs N to S through the center of the islands, can be done by 4WD rental or joining a tour, we enjoyed standing on the benches on the back of a pick up and taking in the amazing views (rather than driving ourselves, as it is steep, windy, pumpy, muddy…) lots of stops incl one up in the mountains at a lunch place.

It
runs N to S through the center of the islands, can be done by 4WD
rental or joining a tour, we enjoyed standing on the benches on the back
of a pick up and taking in the amazing views (rather than driving
ourselves, as it is steep, windy, pumpy, muddy…) lots of stops incl one
up in the mountains at a lunch place.

(rather than driving ourselves, as it is steep, windy, pumpy, muddy…) lots of stops incl one up in the mountains at a lunch place.

Lake Vaihiria

Rather
than driving ourselves, as it is steep, windy, pumpy, muddy…  lots
of stops incl one up in the mountains at a lunch place.

Waterfalls along the road from Mont Orohen.

Waterfalls along the road from Mont Orohen.

Mont Orohena is a mountain located in the South Pacific, on the island of Tahiti. With an elevation of 2,241 metres (7,352 ft)[2] above sea level, it is the highest point of French Polynesia. Mont Orohena is an extinct volcano

Mont
Orohena, an extinct volcano, with  an elevation of 2,241 metres
(7,352 ft) it is the highest point of French Polynesia. 

SY IBEX 🇦🇹  Florian & Vicky- Sunbeam 42′

IBEX VickyIBEX Florian

6) FUEL DOCK & HAUL OUT ADVENTURES 

NUKU HIVA 🇵🇫  FRENCH POLYNESIA 

We successfully filled up with diesel in Nuku Hiva 😊 Interesting arrangement not made for cruisers. No drama for us though. We were lucky with calm seas.

We
successfully filled up with diesel in Nuku Hiva 😊 Interesting
arrangement not made for cruisers. No drama for us though. We were lucky
with calm seas.

Horizon is now on the hard in Hiva Oa.

Horizon is now on the hard in Hiva Oa.tight fit, but they are very professional here

Horizon is now on the hard in Hiva Oa.tight fit, but they are very professional here

Tight fit, but they are very professional here

tight fit, but they are very professional here

SY HORIZON 🇺🇸 Anders & Anette - Outbound 46′

HORIZON MichelleHORIZON Christopher

7) PICTURE OF THE WEEK 

Dreamer Picture of the week !

Dreamer at anchor in Huahine with double rainbow

 SY DREAMER 🇺🇸 David & Gerne - Caliber 40lrv’

DREAMER CrewDREAMER Crew

8) SY ACUSHNET ARRIVES IN 🇵🇫 FRENCH POLYNESIA 
 

We named our boat after the whaling ship that Herman Melville sailed around the world on. 

 named our boat after the whaling ship that Herman Melville sailed around the world on. He set sail in 1839 and in the summer of 1842, Melville and his shipmate Richard Tobias Greene (

He
set sail in 1839 and in the summer of 1842, Melville and his shipmate
Richard Tobias Greene ("Toby") jumped ship at Nuku Hiva Bay… the very
bay we are now anchored in! 

Acushnet

Nuku Hiva:  mission accomplished - South Pacific Posse Burgee 

They're only around three days away from their destination. Since the rules for checking into French Polynesia have changed while they've been at sea, they are now going to check into Hiva-Oa – an island that’s a little closer than Nuku Hiva so they’ve changed course and are heading there. Watch this space!

Since
the rules for checking into French Polynesia have changed while they've
been at sea, they are now going to check into Hiva-Oa – an island
that’s a little closer than Nuku Hiva so they’ve changed course and are
heading there. Watch this space!

LAND HO ACUSHNET

We love how we can simply haul anchor and move whenever we feel like it, and am so excited to explore this new spot.

Last
night we intended to go to a completely different island but diverted
as we heard the main anchorage was full. Going with the flow is what
sailing is all about I guess. Anyone else like this approach to
traveling?

The bay here in Nuku Hiva is large so we have lots of room 

Nuku HIva

Taiohae Bay, Nuku Hiva, Marquesas, French Polynesia  as seen from the Tehaatiki viewpoint

SY ACUSHNET 🇺🇸  Ross & Saskia  - Lagoon 46 

AKUSHNET SaskiaAKUSHNET Ross
BRAVO ZULU

9) UNEXPECTED EXPENSE ALERT  

Two Bags of Laundry Washed and Dried at the Laverie in Papeete

motivation for locals to work on your laundry comes at a  cost 

After two weeks in Fakarava, Gargoyle is making her way 240nm west to the poster-child for paradise, Tahiti. Timing the tides to allow us to slip through Fakarava’s narrow southern pass, we departed at 8:00 AM yesterday. The exit proved easier than anticipated though the appearance of a free diver suddenly surfacing five feet off our bow added a touch of excitement. I didn’t have the heart to yell over and startle them as they only had eyes for the mass of sharks hovering below them however a visible float would perhaps be a good idea when diving a navigational channel. Sharks or gargoyles though, pick your fate. Then we were out and a turn to starboard put us on course for Tahiti’s main port, Papeete. Wondering how to pronounce that? Just sing the line from Southern Cross “on the downhill run to Papeete “. Unfortunately we had zero wind and we motored under a clear blue sky and over a glassy calm sea with just the eternal swell for company. Last night continued calm and we motored slowly towards our destination, hoping for the gods to show us favor and deliver a bit of wind. Finally, as dawn lit the eastern sky the winds settled in enough to allow us to set a sail and make our way, slowly, in the right direction. So as I write this we sail towards towering clouds lit cotton candy pink by another beautiful French Polynesia sunrise. We still have 24 hours to go on our downhill run but journey and destination are in such perfect harmony that we could this run forever.

After two weeks in Fakarava, Gargoyle is making her way 240nm west to the poster-child for paradise, Tahiti.

Timing
the tides to allow us to slip through Fakarava’s narrow southern pass,
we departed at 8:00 AM yesterday. The exit proved easier than
anticipated though the appearance of a free diver suddenly surfacing
five feet off our bow added a touch of excitement. I didn’t have the
heart to yell over and startle them as they only had eyes for the mass
of sharks hovering below them however a visible float would perhaps be a
good idea when diving a navigational channel. Sharks or gargoyles
though, pick your fate.

Then
we were out and a turn to starboard put us on course for Tahiti’s main
port, Papeete. Wondering how to pronounce that? Just sing the line from
Southern Cross “on the downhill run to Papeete “. Unfortunately we had
zero wind and we motored under a clear blue sky and over a glassy calm
sea with just the eternal swell for company.

Last
night continued calm and we motored slowly towards our destination,
hoping for the gods to show us favor and deliver a bit of wind. Finally,
as dawn lit the eastern sky the winds settled in enough to allow us to
set a sail and make our way, slowly, in the right direction.

So
as I write this we sail towards towering clouds lit cotton candy pink
by another beautiful French Polynesia sunrise. We still have 24 hours to
go on our downhill run but journey and destination are in such perfect
harmony that we could this run forever.

When was the last time you had so much fun shopping for groceries that you took a picture? We had a great time stocking up on fresh produce and fish at the local market, which is literally across the street from our marina. As with all of Papeete, it's also filled with amazing people. What a great location!

When
was the last time you had so much fun shopping for groceries that you
took a picture? We had a great time stocking up on fresh produce and
fish at the local market, which is literally across the street from our
marina. As with all of Papeete, it's also filled with amazing people.
What a great location!

Beautiful day for a sail from Tahiti to Mo'orea.

Beautiful day for a sail from Tahiti to Mo'orea.

SY GARGOLYE 🇨🇦 Kevin & Carla  - C.M.P.F. –Beneteau 50′

GARGOYLE KevinGARGOYL Carla

10) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE 
AWARDS CATEGORIES 

 

HERE ARE THE  CATEGORIES 

    BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT* ✔ 

    PICTURE OF THE YEAR ✔  

    SPEEDY AWARD – SEVENSTAR AWARD ✔  

    THE CAPTAIN RON AWARD ✔ 

    MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD ✔ 

    HIGHEST WIND RECORDED ✔ 

    SPIRIT OF EXPLORATION ✔ 

    GALLEY GOD(ESS) ✔ 

    GOOD SAMARITAN OF THE YEAR ✔  

    NEWLY ADDED – BOAT YOGA POSE OF THE YEAR ✔

*no bill-fish

Bora Bora awaits

Bora Bora awaits 

11) THE DANGEROUS MIDDLE 
🇨🇰 COOK ISLANDS

The Cook Islands
are in the South Pacific Ocean, north-east of New Zealand, between
French Polynesia and Fiji. There are fifteen major islands, spread over
2.2 million square kilometers of ocean, divided into two distinct
groups: the Southern Cook Islands, and the Northern Cook Islands of coral atolls.

The
islands were formed by volcanic activity; the northern group is older
and consists of six atolls (sunken volcanoes topped by coral growth).

Dangerous Middle

Three options for travelling through the Cook Islands:

Northern Cook Islands only,
approaching from (for example) Bora Bora. Possible stops in order along
the route would be Penrhyn, Manihiki, Suwarrow and then perhaps
Pukapuka.

Southern Cook Islands only, possible stops would be Rarotonga and perhaps either or both of Aitutaki and Palmerston.

Both northern and southern Cooks, starting in Rarotonga, and continuing to Palmerston, Suwarrow and perhaps Pukapuka.

Rarotonga
is a useful first stop because it is the main center for the Cook
Islands, and provisions can be hard to find in the outer islands.
Whether you stop at the outer islands, in particular Palmerston and
Aitutaki can depend on wind direction and draft -- see the notes on the
pages for those islands.

Rarotonga
is a useful first stop because it is the main centre for the Cook
Islands, and provisions can be hard to find in the outer islands.
Whether you stop at the outer islands, in particular Palmerston and
Aitutaki can depend on wind direction and draft -- see the notes on the
pages for those islands.

 

July Pilot Charts Cook Islands

 

July Pilot Charts Cook Islands

 

currents

 

Currents Cook Islands

https://metvuw.com/forecast/forecast1.php?type=rain&region=swp&tim=204

Weather systems moving west to east through the dangerous middle 

SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE WEATHER ROUTING DEAL 

For weather routing thought the dangerous middle visit  https://pacificposse.com/ocean-tactics

Contact John Martin 
 admin@coastalandoffshorecruising.com

WhatsApp / Tel  +64 27 242 1088

John Martin

John Martin principal
of Ocean Tactics has been assisting skippers with weather and passage
planning in the Pacific  for many years is now an official sponsor
of the South Pacific Posse.

12) FIJI DISCOVERIES  🇫🇯  ANCHORAGES

Superyacht arriving in Port Denarau

Superyachts in Port Denarau

Chris

Yadua Anchorage photo

Yadua Anchorage
 Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort Fiji Anchorage

 Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort Fiji Anchorage

 Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort Fiji
 Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort Fiji

 Jean-Michel Cousteau Resort Fiji 

SY SEAGLUB 🇺🇸 Chris - Hylas 46′

Chris

13) COPRA SHED MARINA 🇫🇯  FIJI
SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

Copra Shed MArina

15% Discount South Pacific Posse

 

COPRA SHED MARINA

 

Copra Shed Marina Savusavu Fiji 

 

Copra Shed Marina

 

BULA !!!

We are excited to welcome the South Pacific Posse to the Copra Shed Marina in Savusavu

As a special recognition we offer a % discount to all participants of the  South Pacific Posse vessels

Geoff  GM 
and Dolly

Savusavu

14)  MARINA SPONSORS OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC  POSSE 

🇺🇸  Safe Harbor South Bay – Chula Vista - USA

🇲🇽  Marina Chiapas – Mexico   

🇨🇷  Marina Papagayo – Costa Rica   

🇵🇦  Shelter Bay Marina – Panama  

🇪🇨  Marina Puerto Amistad – Ecuador  

🇫🇯   Vuda Point Marina - Fiji 

🇻🇺  Yachting World Marina - Port Vila - Vanuatu

🇳🇿  Marsden Cove Marina - New Zealand 

🇦🇺  Rivergate Marina  - Brisbane  - Australia 

🇫🇯  Denarau Marina - Fiji 

🇫🇯  Royal Suva Yacht Club  - Fiji 

🇫🇯  Savu Savu Marina  - Fiji 

15) TRACKING THE 22' PACIFIC POSSE  FLEET 
BROUGHT TO YOU BY PREDICT WIND

 

Tracking

 

Visit https://pacificposse.com/tracking to view the progress of the 22 South Pacific Posse Fleet. 
To be added visit https://pacificposse.com/add-to-tracking

16) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE SPONSORS 

  • PREDICT WIND
  • SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT
  • CENTENARIO PANAMA CANAL AGENTS
  • YACHT AGENTS GALAPAGOS 
  • YACHT SERVICES NUKU HIVA 
  • NOUMEA YACHT SERVICES
  • SAFE HARBOR SOUTH BAY MARINA EVENT CENTER
  • WESTMARINE PRO
  • SAILMAIL 
  • OCEAN TACTICS WEATHER ROUTING
  • CLOUD 9  FIJI

17) SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT

 SPONSORS THE SOUTH POSSE

More info on Sevenstar™s services can be found on https://www.sevenstar-yacht-transport.com/

 

Sevenstar

 

Who is Sevenstar Yacht Transport?

Sevenstar
is the world’s leading provider of yacht shipping services on a
lift-on, lift-off basis. Sevenstar has access to the Spliethoff fleet of
over 120 company owned vessels. With an impressive 1,500+ transports
per year, they are calling over 100 ports in more than 40 countries
worldwide.

For a quote with the Panama Posse discount please contact 
Kris Caren

email: kris@sevenstar-usa.com

web: sevenstar-usa.com

18) PANAMA 🇵🇦 CANAL AGENT 
CENTENARIO CONSULTING ERICK GALVEZ

To
arrange for transit with the Panama Canal Authority please contact Eric
Galvez our dedicated Panama Canal agent and sponsor of the Panama Posse
and the Pacific Posse

Erick Gálvez

info@centenarioconsulting.com

www.centenarioconsulting.com

Cellphone +507 6676-1376

WhatsApp +507 6676-1376

Erick
https://panamaposse.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/new-panama-canal-graphic.jpg

19) STRATEGIC PARTNERS
 

SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION

Abernathy – Chandlery – Panama

Panama Posse 

Atlantic Posse

Advertising Partners – Las Vegas

Safe-Esteem.com – Delaware


SIGN UP FOR 
THE '22 SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE  

WE OPERATE UNDER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW

YOUR VESSEL · YOUR CREW · YOUR RESPONSIBILITY 

 

Green Flash

 

Green Flash and Sunset Picture 
Bora Bora from Huahine French Polynesia 

 

South Pacific Posse

 

south pacific posse communications 
 @ 9811 w charleston blvd 2262 89117 Summerlin USA

 

© 2022 South Pacific Posse / Ocean Posse LLC


Sunsets

FLEET UPDATE 2022-05-28

South Pacific Posse

REFER A FRIEND 
TO RECEIVE  FLEET UPDATES

SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE 
FLEET UPDATE 

May 28, 2022

TOP NEWS THIS WEEK

1) ROYAL SUVA YACHT CLUB 🇫🇯   FIJI 
2) SY LEEANNE RUDDER FAILURE 
 
 

South Pacific Posse 13 Particpant Flag States

1) ROYAL SUVA YACHT CLUB 🇫🇯 FIJI    
SPONSORS THE SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE

RSYC ROYAL SUVA YACHT CLUB 🇫🇯 SPONSORS THE SPP

 FREE 1 MONTH Honorary Membership for South  Pacific Posse 

If
any members of the Pacific Posse arrive at Suva I am happy to inform
you that the RSYC will recognize them as a bonafide member of a club and
grant them the privileges as if they were members of a Yacht/Marine
Club!

Royal Suva Yacht Club

Patrick Todd  

R•S•Y•C

 http://www.rsyc.org.fj/

+679 992 2921

gm@rsyc.org.fj

https://pacificposse.com/royal-suva-yacht-club-fiji

Suva Harbor, Fiji  on the other side of the Dateline 

Royal Suva Yacht Club

2)  SY LEEANN RUDDER FAILURE 

SY Leeanne Rudder Jury Rig Video

The Story:

You
may have noticed we are back in Mexico and not in our original
destination, French Polynesia. As it is a bummer we didn’t make it, we
are so happy to be back with ourselves and the boat in one piece! Long
story short, we were about 500 miles out and found our rudder tube was
cracked and leaking seawater. The fiberglass tube was delaminating from
the hull of the boat. Not good. Trip over. Luckily we noticed the
problem right before we made it to Clarion island which is the last
possible place to stop for another 2000 miles so we pulled over to get a
good look. It was determined by our shoreside support network of expert
sailors that our only course of action was to drop our rudder, epoxy
the leaks, fiberglass some wood gussets around the tube for support, and
sail 550 nautical miles home with no rudder. And that’s what we did.
Luckily we have a @hydrovane that has its own little rudder that we
could use to help get us home. We could not get it to self steer without
the input of a main rudder so Carson and I had to hand steer the little
windvane rudder two hours on, and two hours off, for 5 days and 550
miles under constant threat of the tube breaking and sinking us the
whole way. This is the very very short version of the story, we will
eventually do a full write up of the whole thing soon. We have a lot of
people to tag and thank for helping us through this which will come with
a full write up. We just wanted to get a short explanation out to all
our friends on here who are wondering what’s going on with us! We are
safe, the boat is safe, and most importantly we are happy as ever! 

 Yes, we did have issues with our rudder. We started to hear “knocking” from our rudder post near the top bearing about a day and a half from clarion island so we stopped there to wait for better wind and do some inspections. When we took a look down at our rudder post we found that the fiberglass tube was delaminating and was seeping seawater. So, with our team of experts we all agreed that the rudder had to come out. With the help of the Mexican navy, we were able to successfully drop the rudder in the water at clarion island. Then we built gussets to stabilize the tube and fiberglassed all around the tube. Once that was set and the tube was more stable, we got towed out to sea, set the sails, and sails back to PV using only our Hydrovane rudder. We had to had steer 2 hours on 2 hours off for 5 days. The seas were big and we fought the boat rounding up every few minutes. We used dragging devices and had the sails reefed the entire time. We are now resting in a hotel in PV getting some much needed sleep!

 We
have spent the last few days doing repairs so that we can safely sail
back the 550 nautical miles.it will take us roughly 5-6 days and we will
continue to update daily. We thank you all for your support through
this journey.

Back in Mexico

We are docked! After 17 days we have arrived safely back in La Cruz, MX .

Yes,
we did have issues with our rudder. We started to hear “knocking” from
our rudder post near the top bearing about a day and a half from clarion
island so we stopped there to wait for better wind and do some
inspections. When we took a look down at our rudder post we found that
the fiberglass tube was delaminating and was seeping seawater. So, with
our team of experts we all agreed that the rudder had to come out. With
the help of the Mexican navy, we were able to successfully drop the
rudder in the water at clarion island. Then we built gussets to
stabilize the tube and fiberglassed all around the tube. Once that was
set and the tube was more stable, we got towed out to sea, set the
sails, and sails back to PV using only our Hydrovane rudder. We had to
had steer 2 hours on 2 hours off for 5 days. The seas were big and we
fought the boat rounding up every few minutes. We used dragging devices
and had the sails reefed the entire time. We are now resting in a hotel
in PV getting some much needed sleep!

Rudder jury Rig

We
are now headed to London!! A big pivot from our South Pacific plans but
we are determined to make the best of it! Getting in a lil belated
honeymoon trip exploring Europe over the next few weeks 🥳 SV LeeAnn
will be hauled out next week, repairs done, put back in the water and we
will return to her whole again! 

We can’t wait to explore a new place! 

With love, 

LEEANNE

With love, 

SY LEEANN 🇺🇸  Jamie & Carson - Beneteau Oceanis 46′

Carson
Jamie

3) ENTRY INTO GALLEY GOD(DESS ) AWARD

Galley Godess

Thought I’d send through some pics for Galley Goddess Award.

Below is Pizza cooked on the Cobb at Punaruku, Makemo, and above Fried Chicken on the Cobb, Fakarava.

BLue Heeler

Cheers!

Blue Heeler update on our time at Fakarava. 

Useful info if you’re heading that way. 

http://blueheelerhr39.com/2022/05/26/fakarava-tuamotos/

WALL OF SHARKS!! Fakarava Tuamotos by Sailing Blue Heeler
Vessel leaving Passe Tiputa at Rangiroa one hour before high tide. Increased swell in region causing strong outflow. The guy on the bow is having fun!

Vessel
leaving Passe Tiputa at Rangiroa one hour before high tide. Increased
swell in region causing strong outflow.  The guy on the bow is
having fun!

Passe Hiria de Tiputa - Rangiroa

Passe Hiria de Tiputa - Rangiroa 

SY  BLUE HEELER 🇦🇺  Ally & Wayne - Hallberg Rassy 39‘

BLuee Heeler
Alison

4) SUPPLY CHAIN 101
 FAKARAVA, TUAMOTUS 🇵🇫 FRENCH POLYNESIA 

Fakarava Magasin

This
is the Tumoana magasin in Fakarava on Wednesday morning when the supply
ship arrives.  Thirty three boats are in the anchorage are vying
for the limited fruits and veggies at this small table as each box of
items is set out.  Nearly all the fruit/veggies were gone in two
hours.   Same thing happened at the boulangerie south of town at
15:00.  Plan your arrival the evening prior to get into town early.

Magasin

Inside
the atoll is a lagoon.  The atoll is comprised of coral reefs
called motus.  Between these motus are small channels that are
created by seawater coming through the atoll from the ocean.  Carl
and I spend hours snorkeling and floating from the edge of the atoll
into the lagoon.  The channels can be shallow or very deep. This
one was about 200 meters long and 30 feet deep.  Loaded with bright
coral (purple, pink, yellow) and school of brightly colored fish.
Floating with the inbound tide current over these wonders is like
flying in your dreams.  After painting from my paddle board, I dove
in.

ROxy

SY SKY POND  🇨🇰   Carl & Roxy - Seawind 1160 38′

Roxy
Carl
Fakarava

Fakarava, Tuamotus, French Polynesia is in Good Nautical

5) PICTURES OF THE WEEK 

 

The Ibex  Sunset Series

Ibex

Tuamotus  Sunset  1 

Tuamotus Sunset

Tuamotus  Sunset  2 

Tuamotus Sunset

Tuamotus  Sunset 3 

Ibex and the Coconut Oil Factory

Ibex and the Coconut Oil Factory 

rotosieve

Classic Rotosieve add coconut meat on top oil comes out of the front 

End product once packaged

End product once packaged

SY IBEX 🇦🇹  Florian & Waltraud - Sunbeam 42′

FLorian
Vicky

6) SY RHAPSODY ARRIVES IN 🇵🇫 FRENCH POLYNESIA 
 

 About
3:00 am. Morning of day 20, graveyard watch as usual. Sarah mentioned
seeing skimming birds feeding at dusk last night when we were just under
100 nm. from land. Birds are always our last send off and first
greeters on passage. Also, as is usual since leaving Panama, a red
footed booby has chosen our bow rail to rest for the night. We marvel at
the flexibility and unwavering tenacity their webbed feet display in
gripping slimy, salted 1” stainless steel pipe bouncing about for hour
upon hour.

4:00
am. The chart plotter shows we are nearing our first possible glimpse
of terra firma since leaving views of San Cristobal, the western most
volcanic landscape of the Galápagos Islands, in our wake almost 3 weeks
ago. UO-HUKA, at the eastern edge of French Polynesia, is for now just a
lurking, dark, blurry shape resting nebulous on the southern horizon
under overcast and moody skies. The waxing half moon set 2 hours ago.
We’ve been getting scattered spit, drizzle, and mini squalls since
sunset causing the need to put away cushions and pillows to dry corners
only to return them minutes later.After 20 days at sea,

Over 3000 nautical miles,

5 trips by Bob into the back lazerette to fix the autopilot

One broken halyard

One Code Zero sail retrieved from the water

3 days of on and off hand steering  Land Ho! 

LAND HO RHAPSODY

Exerts from their blog https://www.rhapsodyontheblue.com  

In
finishing up our passage from the Galapagos Islands to French Polynesia
I asked my family if they had any questions for us. They came up with
some great ones. My answers are in blue, and Bob's are italicized

 

What
was something that you loved that you didn’t foresee and what was
something you were worried about that you didn’t need to be? 

Although
it was not technically on this section of the passage, I loved the
Doldrums. Admittedly we had a motor and so we were not relying on the
wind to get us through, but I loved the stillness of the ocean. The
absolute glassiness of it. The things that I worried about I am not sure
that I didn’t need to concerned about. We worried about them so that we
would do everything we could to stop them from happening. 

Better
than I thought was how fast the time passed, with special thanks to
reading.  I worried that sleep loss could become a cumulative
problem, but that wasn't really the case.

 

How
was your experience extending a strange alternating sleep schedule over
the long time period? Did you ever fall asleep on watch? 

Our
watch schedule is a natural extension of our typical habits. Bob tends
to fall asleep earlier than I do, and thus wake up earlier. We just push
this schedule to its limits and it works well. Bob falls asleep as
early as he can, sometimes as early as 7, then wakes up at 1 or 2 and
takes over from me. I like to stay up reading, so I just push that to
staying up later and later, then I get to sleep in the morning. There
were certainly days that our rhythms were interrupted by weather or
equipment breakage, but then we just take turns napping during the day.

My
experiences on previous passages prepared me well mentally, however on
this passage the motion of the boat was a greater challenge to both
getting and staying asleep.

What would you do differently if you did it again?

I
would download more podcasts, they are great company on nightwatch. I
thought I had done so, but most of them were gone by the time I wanted
to listen to them.

I agree with more podcasts, but if we could find the right person, another crew member would be worthwhile.

What food that you provisioned did you wish you had more of and which food did you never actually eat?

We
would have liked to have more non dairy ice cream but the freezer just
couldn't hold any more. Also more lettuce would have been nice, but it
is difficult to get it to last.

I
agree with the lettuce and ice cream, and would add more hummus. We did
not use many canned goods, but those are really provisioned for our
remaining months before large groceries in Papeete.

Did
you think about people who had made this crossing before access to
technologies you have? Anyone in particular? Did you feel connected to
past explorers and sailors in some way out in the vast open blue? 

Thank
goodness for technology! To do this without GPS, our chartplotter and
our Sat phone would have been a totally different experience,  and
not something that I believe it would have enjoyed. I did think about
those who came before us and how their experiences differed from ours.

Certainly
one cannot discount the advantages of GPS and the security that
knowledge feeds you every day you are out of sight of land. When I think
of the Polynesians, that for thousands of years, explored these same
waters by reading the waves, the wind, and determining their location by
holding their hand up to the stars, I am humbled. 

All
who have gone to sea before us, and all our fellow cruisers today
readily share information. Technology and information properly applied
keeps us safe, and allows us to continue following in the path of the
real explorers.

 

At what point in your crossing did you feel most isolated?

For
a while our text messaging app was not working.  When I wasn't
getting any messages from the outside world I definitely felt isolated.

When
the autopilot had troubles twice in one day, along with battery
charging issues, I felt we could be out there days longer with constant
handsteering and maybe a loss of refrigeration. But isolation is
relative when you know you just have to fix things the best you can and
keep going.

 

What was the most: Fun? Rewarding? Emotionally moving? Boring? Challenging? Unexpected?

Wow,
that's a lot! Boring is easy - the lack of being able to do many things
I love to do, go for a walk, make art, make music. There was just too
much motion of the boat to feel comfortable enough to do the last two.

Unexpected
would be the number of small (4-5 inches) squid that would be found on
deck in the morning at the beginning of the passage. At night I could
shine a bright light into the water and see the light reflecting in the
red eyes of the squid. They disappeared about halfway through the
passage, but on our list of things yet to do is to clean up the squid
ink on deck.

Most
fun was ten minutes with dolphins swimming along in our bow wake. Most
rewarding was finally getting to prove we could do it. Getting the
battery charger and autopilot to work again, thus avoiding minor
calamities was a real emotional lift. Most boring was the first third of
a book by William F. Buckley I gave up on. Most challenging was
remaining able bodied and more or less upright for 20 days straight on a
broken carnival ride. Unexpected, was how quickly the time passed.

Were there times when you were nervous or scared? 

We
have made enough smaller passages that I wasn't really nervous or
scared, but as is often the case, the most nerve-wracking is usually at
the end. In this case in the last 24 hours we had winds up to 25 knots
and 3 meter seas. We have had continuing issues with our bio growth in
our fuel and clogging the filters. We (and by we, I mean Bob) changed
the filters for safety reasons for the last hour before entering the
harbor at Nuku Hiva. The winds we gusting up to 22 knots and the waves
were 3 meters and coming at us from the side. We were motoring at this
point to get into the harbor. At the mouth of the harbor are two very
large rocks they call sentinels that we had to pass between. We were
making plans as to what to do if the engine failed at that point (pull
out the sails and turn back out to sea). For me this was definitely the
hairiest part of the passage. All ended well, the engine didn't die, we
made it past the sentinels, into the harbor and safely set anchor. 

Sometimes the way Sarah looks at me when she's handing me the hammer is pretty scary.

Favorite constellations as viewed mid-ocean? 

Transit of Venus and Jupiter every morning just before first light.

I
loved watching the Milky Way and seeing the Southern Cross, but I have
to admit that for all the hype that the Southern Cross gets, it is
pretty small in comparison to Northern Hemisphere constellations like
the Big Dipper or Orion. I think that the Souuthern Cross must have a
pretty good agent promoting it.

How did the food provisioning work out?

Our freezer is not big enough for everything that we would like to bring, otherwise excellent.

Our
chocolate stash of artesian chocolate from Chocolopagos lasted until
the very last days, then we knew it was time for landfall. We still had
some carrots, cabbage and potatoes left at the end, we did not have to
resort to a totally canned meal.

How do you navigate? Do you shoot the sun just for fun?

We
have no sextant aboard. We rely on satellite GPS, either through our
chartplotter or our handheld radios. GPS is worldwide accurate. Besides,
too many billion cell phone users, militaries, and Uber drivers need it
for it to fail. If by the strangest twist of fate GPS failed we would
fall back to our compass, paper charts, the position of stars and
planets if visible, and dead reckoning. You adapt.

We
plot a course on the chartplotter before we depart and then over the
length of this long passage we attempted to stay on course, often
correcting for the wind and the currents which seemed to want to take us
further south than we wanted to go.

What is the deepest part of the Pacific that you have crossed?

I think about 19,000 ft.

When
we are sailing over the top we can't really tell if the water is
several hundred feet deep or several thousand,  it all looks the
same. And once the numbers go over several hundred feet our depth
monitor just says: depth - - -

 

RHAPSODY ARRIVES

SY RHAPSODY 🇺🇸 Sarah & Bob  - Jeanneau 49′

Bob
Sarah
BRAVO ZULU

7) MEET THE FLEET 

MEET THE FLEET

Retired medical doctor sailing  with my wife Guylène from Marseille to New Zealand with our  42' aluminum sloop.

SY KAWAINE II  🇨🇭 Guylène & Jean-Dominique - C.M.P.F. – Fecamp 42′

8) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE 
AWARDS CATEGORIES 

 

HERE ARE THE  CATEGORIES 

    BIGGEST FISH CAUGHT* ✔ 

    PICTURE OF THE YEAR ✔  

    SPEEDY AWARD – SEVENSTAR AWARD ✔  

    THE CAPTAIN RON AWARD ✔ 

    MOST UNWELCOME VISITOR ONBOARD ✔ 

    HIGHEST WIND RECORDED ✔ 

    SPIRIT OF EXPLORATION ✔ 

    GALLEY GOD(ESS) ✔ 

    GOOD SAMARITAN OF THE YEAR ✔  

    NEWLY ADDED – BOAT YOGA POSE OF THE YEAR ✔

*no bill-fish

Clarity of Kandavu Waters

50 feet visibility at anchor in Kandavu 🇫🇯  Fiji 

9) OHANA 🇵🇫 THE OTOGI PASS 
TOAU, TUAMOTUS FRENCH POLYNESIA 

 passe otugi slack Toau - Otugi Pass, Tuamotu Archipel by SY OHANA

Video of  Passe Otugi slack tide Toau  Tuamotus, French Polynesia

Bays

Anchored at Anse Amyot Toau, French Polynesia 15°48'10.5"S 146°09'07.7"W  TOAU

Tuamotu 2

SY OHANA 🇮🇲  Aisling & Darryl - Lagoon 46′

Aisling
Darryl
Anse Amyot Toau in Good Nautical

10) CHRIS  SCOUTN SYDNEY 🇦🇺  AUSTRALIA

Seaglub

Meet
Chris on SeaGlub - Lead Vessel of this season's South Pacific Posse
currently scouting the Australia Routes at select whiskey bars in
Sydney 

The Baxter Inn - Sydney

11) MO'OREA  🇵🇫 WINDWARD ISLANDS 
FRENCH POLYNESIA

Gargoyle

Cooks Bay,  Moorea, Society Islands, French Polynesia 

Mo'orea

Mo'orea history

According to recent archaeological evidence, the Society Islands were settled from Samoa and Tonga around 200 AD. 

Nine
tribal principalities emerged in the enclosed valleys, which in turn
were subdivided into individual clans. The stratified society was
characterized by a hierarchical leadership whose elite combined both
political and religious power. The leading families of Mo'orea remained
linked by marriage and kinship for centuries with those of the
neighboring island of Tahiti. These connections led to important
alliances, but at other times were also the source of bloody
conflicts. 

The
marae, a stone platform, was where the gods communicated with the
Polynesians and political, social and religious decisions were made. The
marae was tapu—sacrosanct. To violate it was to call down the gods’
wrath.

On
Mo‘orea  the largest collection of maraes is in the Opunohu
Valley. More than 550 structures have been uncovered, including more
than 100 maraes. 

On Mo‘orea, 10 minutes from Tahiti by plane (30-45 minutes by ferry), the largest collection of maraes is in the Opunohu Valley. More than 550 structures have been uncovered, including more than 100 maraes.

SY  GARGOLYE 🇨🇦  Kevin & Carla  - Beneteau 50′

Kevin
Carla

12)  MARINA SPONSORS OF THE SOUTH PACIFIC  POSSE 

🇺🇸  Safe Harbor South Bay – Chula Vista - USA

🇲🇽  Marina Chiapas – Mexico   

🇨🇷  Marina Papagayo – Costa Rica   

🇵🇦  Shelter Bay Marina – Panama  

🇪🇨  Marina Puerto Amistad – Ecuador  

🇫🇯  Vuda Point Marina - Fiji 

🇻🇺  Yachting World Marina - Port Vila - Vanuatu

🇳🇿  Marsden Cove Marina - New Zealand 

🇦🇺  Rivergate Marina  - Brisbane  - Australia 

🇫🇯  Denarau Marina - Fiji 

🇫🇯  Royal Suva Yacht Club  - Fiji 

13) SAMOA 🇼🇸  

Samoan Dancer

Polynesian Samoan dances in Apia 🇼🇸 Samoa

Aggie Grey's

The ancient art of fire (sword) dancing originated  in Polynesia
Taking
his inspiration from the Samoan warrior, a  fire knife dancer
takes center stage twirling, tossing, catching and throwing a flaming
machete at high speeds. 

Fire

Taking
his inspiration from the Samoan warrior, a  fire knife dancer
takes center stage twirling, tossing, catching and throwing a flaming
machete at high speeds.

The
fire knife itself, called “nifo oti," is an ancient Samoan weapon that
features a 14-inch blade with a hook on the end.  Before the
addition of fire, the traditional Samoan knife dancer portrayed the
movements of the warrior at battle. The custom eventually evolved into
performance art, with the dancer slicing objects in mid-air.

nifo oti samoa

Human migration  from Indonesia into Micronesia, Melanesia and  Polynesia 

Cultures

During
Colonial times Samoa consisting of the islands of Upolu, Savai'i,
Apolima and Manono  was a German protectorate from 1900 until the
takeover by New Zealand forces during World War 1

German Colony

The
takeover of Samoa was New Zealand's first military action in World War
I. In late August 1914 with landings by the Samoa Expeditionary Force
from New Zealand on behalf of King George V. The Samoa Expeditionary
Force remained in the country until 1915. 

MAP

Vailima,
a German-style lager brewed in Samoa here are two versions to choose
from, the normal 4.9% strength and the the export-only 6.7%.

Vailima, a German-style lager, has been brewed in Samoa since 1978. There are two versions to choose from, the normal 4.9% strength and the the export-only 6.7%.

14) HOW WE FLOAT OUR ANCHOR CHAIN 

Picture of the Week

Where and why we float the chain: 
At
anchorages with (lots of) coral heads to avoid the chain tangling on
those coral heads. If the chain would tangle on the coral heads it would
have a couple of adverse effects: the catenary effect of the chain is
reduced (or even eliminated if tangled very close to the bow of the
yacht), lifting the anchor might be difficult or even impossible without
diving, the galvanization of the anchor chain chafes off faster, more
coral gets destroyed. The adverse effect of floating the chain is
obviously to loose the friction of the part of the chain which is
floating. The way we position / deploy the buoys we end up with some 10m
chain on the seabed. There is obviously a residual risk of even that
chain tangling, but less likely given of the length of the chain
thereafter and rather stable wind direction of the trade winds.

Floating your anchor chain over coral explained

Which buoyancy devices we use: 
When
we arrived in the Tuamotus we started off with fenders as we did not
carry anything else. The disadvantage of fenders is that they compress
if they submerse, one gets growth on them, etc. Those hard plastique
pearl farm buoys are much better. Some people say, they are washed
ashore everywhere in the Tuamotus. Well that was not our experience.
Kauehi was our first atoll and in any reasonable distance from the
village the shore line was cleaned by the locals. Nevertheless, many
villagers have their stash of pearl farm buoys in their gardens. So we
simply walked to one obviously very friendly fellow and asked whether we
could have four of them. He actually picked the four nicest he had, of
the same color, including lines attached to them and did not even want
to have anything in return. We put on clips/little carabines to the ends
of the lines for fast attachment / detachment to/from the anchor chain
and were ready to go.

 

What kind of clips we use: 
We
use little stainless steel carabiners, the size is basically driven by
the diameter to fit through a chain link, i.e. it needs to be
sufficiently thin (we have a 10mm DIN chain, so carabiners end up being
like 4-5cm in length), we use different sorts, i.e. whatever we found in
our related spare part bag

 

Where we position the buoys: 
Our
approach is to put the first buoy typically / normal conditions at 10m
plus water depth from the anchor, then a buoy every 5m of chain, after
the fourth we let out another 7-8m of chain and then hook the bridle.
There are other recommendations which take a multiplier to water depth
(like 1.5x or 2x water depth), but we just find that not suitable to
accommodate for all ranges of water depths. The 10m basically decides
how much chain ends up on the seabed, one could do less if the sandy
patch is really small or more if there is a larger sandy patch to anchor
(in case one sees that at all).

With
this approach we end up with a few meters more chain out than based on
our non-floating chain length rule under normal conditions (we apply
waterdepth plus 30m) – in bad conditions we obviously deploy more in
both cases (non-floating and floating).

 

How we deploy the buoys: 
First
we explore to find the spot we want to anchor as usual. If possible we
would look for a sandy patch for the anchor itself, but despite the
clear water, when anchoring in deeper water we are not able to see for
good and/or be able to drop the anchor that accurately. We put out as
much chain as we feel comfortable to “drive in” the anchor. Then we pull
up the chain again to the first spot for the first buoy (the 10m +
water depth), then put out 5m chain, attach a buoy, etc. (lifting the
anchor is as usual, just stopping at every buoy and unclipping it, it
does not really delay the process once one gets the hang of it).

 

How we clip on the clips: 
For
us it is exactly the same as putting the chain hook / bridle on. So in
our case we have to bend over the pull pit and downward to clip them on,
but as said, that’s the same as we do with the bridle as well and
“normal procedure” for us. If we had a set-up where the chain hook would
come through the bow roller, the clips could go through as well as they
are way smaller than our chain hook and in our case it would be easy to
get a clip and line from the front through the bowroller back on deck.
Difficulties I could only see arising if it was – due to bow design /
set-up – tricky to get to the chain outside of the bow or the clip from
the front through the bowroller back on deck or into the chain locker,
but that’s set-up specific, hard to comment in general (in the worst
case I would deploy by dinghy).

 

General experience:
 In
general, the boat swings easier than with a non-floating chain, due to
the missing friction of the chain length towards the yacht. In places
where the wind is dominant anyways and is stable trade wind from the
same sector all the time, that’s no issue at all. In places, where
swinging is dominated rather by current or tide, one obviously has to
check for the space.

In
our case only the buoy closest to the yacht is floating on water level
in a low wind situation, the others are submersed. We actually measured
in one instance the depths of the clips on the anchor chain on an
anchorage where the anchor was at 11.5m depths: the clips of the buoys
were at 7m, 4m, 2m and 0m water depth respectively (starting from the
anchor) at low wind.

Floats

SY IBEX 🇦🇹  Florian & Waltraud - Sunbeam 42′

FLorian
Vicky

15) TRACKING THE 22' PACIFIC POSSE  FLEET 
BROUGHT TO YOU BY PREDICT WIND

Tracking

Visit https://pacificposse.com/tracking to view the progress of the 22 South Pacific Posse Fleet. 
To be added visit https://pacificposse.com/add-to-tracking

16) SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE SPONSORS 

  • PREDICT WIND
  • SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT
  • CENTENARIO PANAMA CANAL AGENTS
  • YACHT AGENTS GALAPAGOS 
  • YACHT SERVICES NUKU HIVA 
  • NOUMEA YACHT SERVICES
  • SAFE HARBOR SOUTH BAY MARINA EVENT CENTER
  • WESTMARINE PRO
  • SAILMAIL 
  • OCEAN TACTICS WEATHER ROUTING
  • CLOUD 9  FIJI

17) SEVENSTAR YACHT TRANSPORT

 SPONSORS THE SOUTH POSSE

More info on Sevenstar™s services can be found on https://www.sevenstar-yacht-transport.com/

Sevenstar

Who is Sevenstar Yacht Transport?

Sevenstar
is the world’s leading provider of yacht shipping services on a
lift-on, lift-off basis. Sevenstar has access to the Spliethoff fleet of
over 120 company owned vessels. With an impressive 1,500+ transports
per year, they are calling over 100 ports in more than 40 countries
worldwide.

For a quote with the Panama Posse discount please contact 
Kris Caren

email: kris@sevenstar-usa.com

web: sevenstar-usa.com

18) PANAMA 🇵🇦 CANAL AGENT 
CENTENARIO CONSULTING ERICK GALVEZ

To
arrange for transit with the Panama Canal Authority please contact Eric
Galvez our dedicated Panama Canal agent and sponsor of the Panama Posse
and the Pacific Posse

Erick Gálvez

info@centenarioconsulting.com

www.centenarioconsulting.com

Cellphone +507 6676-1376

WhatsApp +507 6676-1376

Erick
https://panamaposse.com/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/new-panama-canal-graphic.jpg

19) STRATEGIC PARTNERS
 

SEVEN SEAS CRUISING ASSOCIATION

Abernathy – Chandlery – Panama

Panama Posse 

Atlantic Posse

Advertising Partners – Las Vegas

Safe-Esteem.com – Delaware

SIGN UP FOR 
THE '22 SOUTH PACIFIC POSSE  

WE OPERATE UNDER INTERNATIONAL MARITIME LAW

YOUR VESSEL · YOUR CREW · YOUR RESPONSIBILITY 

VAVA'U

Vessels at anchor in Vava'u 🇹🇴  Tonga

South Pacific Posse

south pacific posse communications 
 @ 9811 w charleston blvd 2262 89117 Summerlin USA

 

© 2022 South Pacific Posse / Ocean Posse LLC


Minerva Reefs

MINERVA REEFS

A group of two submerged atolls located in the Pacific Ocean south of Fiji and Tonga. The islands are the subject of a territorial dispute between both nations, and in addition were briefly claimed by American Libertarians as the center of a micronation, the Republic of Minerva.

PICTURES FROM SV CARINTHIA